Science

  • Most Topular Stories

  • Hi-Res GPS Gives Location Down to the Centimeter

    Discovery
    24 Apr 2014 | 9:00 am
    A $1.2 billion system of satellites and ground stations would give unprecedented accuracy.
  • Sara Seager’s Tenacious Drive to Discover Another Earth

    Science | Smithsonian
    22 Apr 2014 | 11:00 am
    Planetary scientist Sara Seager has turned tragedy into tenacity in her search for new Earths among the stars
  • Binary Supermassive Black Hole System Discovered

    Breaking Science News | Sci-News.com
    Sci-News.com
    24 Apr 2014 | 4:08 am
    Astronomers using ESA’s XMM-Newton X-ray observatory have discovered, for the first time, a pair of supermassive black holes in orbit around one another in an ordinary galaxy. Most massive galaxies in the Universe are thought to harbor at least one supermassive black hole at their center. Two supermassive black holes are the smoking gun that [...]
  • Greater London population at risk of future heat waves

    Laboratory News » News
    LaboratoryNews
    23 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    Properly adapting buildings for climate change could significantly reduce the risk of heat-related deaths say researchers who have modelled the effects of future heat waves on the Greater London population in 2050. The University of Oxford model – which takes into account of future changes to urban land use and man-made heat emissions – estimates an additional 800 heat-related deaths per year by 2050. Published in the journal Climatic Change, the research suggests policy makers should focus efforts on adapting buildings and cities for future climate change. The study used projections of…
  • Award-Winning Microscope Images Come to Life in Extraordinary Videos

    Wired
    Betsy Mason
    23 Apr 2014 | 11:31 am
    The Nikon Small World photomicrography competition was expanded to include video three years ago, and the result has been an incredible look into living things on the microscopic scale. This year's winning video is a three-dimensional look through a 10-day-old quail embryo growing inside its egg.
 
 
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    Futurity

  • Extra sleep may help us feel better faster

    Karen Kreeger-Penn
    24 Apr 2014 | 9:24 am
    When we get sick, it feels natural to try to speed up our recovery by getting some extra shuteye. New research with fruit flies suggests it’s a good idea. “It’s an intuitive response to want to sleep when you get sick,” says Julie A. Williams, research associate at the Center for Sleep and Circadian Neurobiology at University of Pennsylvania. “Many studies have used sleep deprivation as a means to understand how sleep contributes to recovery, if it does at all, but there is surprisingly little experimental evidence that supports the notion that more sleep helps…
  • More brains don’t always lead to better decisions

    Morgan Kelly-Princeton
    24 Apr 2014 | 9:02 am
    We tend to think that a group decision is more likely to be accurate when there are more brains involved—but that might not be true in all situations. Researchers report that smaller groups actually tend to make more accurate decisions, while larger assemblies may become excessively focused on only certain pieces of information. The findings present a significant caveat to what is known about collective intelligence, or the “wisdom of crowds,” wherein individual observations—even if imperfect—coalesce into a single, accurate group decision. Related Articles On FuturityNew…
  • Talking about social class eases college achievement gap

    Clifton B. Parker-Stanford
    24 Apr 2014 | 8:54 am
    New research finds that talking about social class helps first-generation college students reduce the social-class achievement gap by as much as 63 percent. Using a “difference-education” approach, these students had higher grade-point averages and took better advantage of college resources than peers who didn’t participate in the discussion. Research has shown that first-generation college students—those who do not have a parent with a college degree—often lag behind other students in grades and graduation rates. They also often struggle socially, finding it hard to…
  • To get a better workout, get a virtual exercise buddy

    Sarina Gleason-Michigan State
    24 Apr 2014 | 8:53 am
    A cyber buddy might just give exercise enthusiasts—and those who are less than “enthused”—the extra nudge they need during a workout, new research suggests. The study, which appears in the Games for Health Journal, is the first to indicate that although a human partner is still a better motivator during exercise, a software-generated partner also can be effective. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of MissouriFitness programs for minorities lack inputPenn StateAmericans exercise more, but not enoughNew York UniversityAfter cancer, exercise eases swollen limbs “We…
  • New drug shows promise to treat cocaine addiction

    Ellen Goldbaum-Buffalo
    24 Apr 2014 | 8:33 am
    A new compound that targets an important brain receptor dramatically blocks cocaine’s reward effect and significantly blunts relapse, new research with rats shows. Jun-Xu Li, assistant professor of pharmacology and toxicology at the University at Buffalo, says the study is one of the first to show convincingly that the drug (known as RO5263397) has the potential to treat cocaine addiction. The findings are especially important, Li says, since despite many years of research, there are no effective medications for treating cocaine addiction. Related Articles On FuturityUniversity of…
 
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    Science 2.0

  • Paying Closer Attention To Attention

    News Staff
    24 Apr 2014 | 10:26 am
    Ellen's (not her real name) adoptive parents weren't surprised when the school counselor suggested that she might have attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). Several professionals had made this suggestion over the years. Given that homework led to one explosion after another, and that at school Ellen, who is eleven, spent her days jiggling up and down in her seat, unable to concentrate for more than ten minutes, it seemed a reasonable assumption. Yet her parents always felt that ADHD didn't quite capture the extent of Ellen's issues over the years. Fortunately the school counsellor…
  • Small Business Owners Don't Expect Fairness, They Are Thinking About Survival

    News Staff
    24 Apr 2014 | 10:21 am
    During the 2012 US Presidential election, both political parties were tripping over themselves to claim they cared about small business, either by sabotaging them with more costs in the way of health care on one side or by constantly giving breaks to giant multinational corporations that small businesses could not get on the other. read more
  • Youth Baseball: Take The Bat, Leave The Candy At Home

    News Staff
    24 Apr 2014 | 10:09 am
    Nothing is more antithetical to baseball culture than apple slices and kale chips - fans want crackerjack and beer and hot dogs. For events, that's okay, but it is also a recurring part of youth sports, according to researchers at Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center. An observational study (naturally) published in Childhood Obesity found that high-calorie snacks and sugar-sweetened drinks dominate the youth baseball scene.  read more
  • SPASER Tech: Your T-shirt's Ringing

    News Staff
    24 Apr 2014 | 7:17 am
    A new version of SPASER (surface plasmon amplification by stimulated emission of radiation) technology being investigated could mean that mobile phones become so small, efficient, and flexible they could be printed on clothing. 'Hey, is that your t-shirt ringing or mine?' Researchers have modeled the world's first SPASER to be made completely of carbon. As you guessed by the definition, because the SP replaces the L in LASER, a SPASER is effectively a nanoscale laser or nanolaser. It emits a beam of light through the vibration of free electrons, rather than the space-consuming electromagnetic…
  • Come Hither Bacteria, Though I Know You Mean Me Harm

    News Staff
    24 Apr 2014 | 7:02 am
    There's a hidden battle happening planet-wide at the microbe level.  Researchers have discovered that Arabidopsis thaliana, a small flowering plant widely used as a model organism in plant biology, puts out a welcome mat to bacteria seeking to invade, and a new study reveals new targets during the battle between microbe and host that researchers can exploit to protect plants. Basically, if the winter annual is putting out a welcome met, scientists have discovered that mat's molecular mix. The study reveals new targets during the battle between microbe and host that researchers can…
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    Sciencebase Science Blog

  • What is Protomyxzoa Rheumatica?

    David Bradley
    16 Apr 2014 | 12:14 am
    A contact on Twitter mentioned an apparently newly discovered parasitic disease which goes by the name of Protomyxzoa Rheumatica or the “Fry bug”, named for its apparent discoverer Fry Laboratories of Scottsdale, Arizona. The discoverers have published no scientific papers about this organism as far as I can tell. Although protomyxzoa.org (registered in September 2012) says Fry has a PCR test for the pathogen and the person running the site says they were diagnosed by the labs in February of that year. No reference to Protomyxzoa Rheumatica comes up with a search of the Fry…
  • Planetary cakes

    David Bradley
    1 Apr 2014 | 12:17 am
    Who wouldn’t want a spongy Jupiter or a vanilla Earth with tectonic icing? I do wish they’d not misspelled concentric, but never mind. Can I have a slice of Jupiter with the spot? Planetary cakes is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom Subscribe to our Email Newsletter
  • First World Problems

    David Bradley
    26 Mar 2014 | 6:53 am
    First-world Problems…you know the kind of thing…and the biggest most self-referential of them is worrying that that the phrase is itself not politically correct! There ain’t no problem that’s too small For us to gripe and moan and bawl There ain’t a thing we can’t complain We even groan when it don’t rain Sunshine’s warm but that’s not all We have the food, we live the life But little things they give us strife The time we have we often waste We move too fast, less speed more haste The angst it cuts you like a knife First world problems…
  • 10 cancer myths busted

    David Bradley
    24 Mar 2014 | 6:55 am
    Cancer Research UK has an interesting post busting ten of the most irritating and persistent pieces of deceived wisdom about cancer: Myth 1: Cancer is a man-made, modern disease Myth 2: Superfoods prevent cancer Myth 3: ‘Acidic’ diets cause cancer Myth 4: Cancer has a sweet tooth Myth 5: Cancer is a fungus – and sodium bicarbonate is the cure Myth 6: There’s a miracle cancer cure… Myth 7: …And Big Pharma is suppressing it Myth 8: Cancer treatment kills more than it cures Myth 9: We’ve made no progress in fighting cancer Myth 10: Sharks don’t get cancer Don’t believe…
  • Sciencebase first tweets

    David Bradley
    21 Mar 2014 | 2:45 am
    I’ve been on Twitter since June 2007, I wasn’t particularly active early on, as you can see from the frequency of tweets in my archive. But for those of you worried that I changed over the years, here’s a screengrab from my archive showing the first clutch of tweets and their relevance then to what I still post about now – Songs, Snaps, Science. Not that, as far as I know, anyone cares…but you were warned early on. ;-) Incidentally, there is a quick way to reveal your very first tweet here. You could put my twitter handle in there if you really want to see my…
 
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    Newswise: SciNews

  • Astronomical Forensics Uncover Planetary Disks in Hubble Archive

    Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI)
    24 Apr 2014 | 12:00 pm
    Astronomers using NASA's Hubble Space Telescope have applied a new image processing technique to obtain near-infrared scattered light images of five disks in images of young stars in the Mikulski Archive for Space Telescopes database. These disks are telltale evidence for newly formed planets.
  • Researchers Build New "Off Switch" to Shut Down Neural Activity

    Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI)
    24 Apr 2014 | 12:00 pm
    Howard Hughes Medical Institute (HHMI) scientists have used an analysis of channelrhodopsin's molecular structure to guide a series of genetic mutations to the ion channel that grant the power to silence neurons with an unprecedented level of control.
  • You May Have Billions and Billions of Good Reasons for Being Unfit

    Universite de Montreal
    24 Apr 2014 | 12:00 pm
    Although our chromosomes are relatively stable within our lifetimes, the genetic material found in our mitochondria is highly variable across individuals and may impact upon human health, say researchers at the University of Montreal and its affiliated CHU Sainte-Justine Hospital.
  • Study Finds Accelerated Soil Carbon Loss, Increasing the Rate of Climate Change

    Northern Arizona University
    24 Apr 2014 | 12:00 pm
    Research published in Science found that increased levels of CO2 in the atmosphere cause soil microbes to produce more carbon dioxide, accelerating climate change.Two Northern Arizona University researchers led the study, which challenges previous understanding about how carbon accumulates in soil.
  • Presidential Initiative Creates Team of Engineers, Plant Scientists to Develop Smart Plants

    Iowa State University
    24 Apr 2014 | 10:30 am
    Iowa State University engineers and plant scientists are working together to study and develop better crops. The research team has organized an International Workshop on Engineered Crops April 28-29 in Des Moines, Iowa.
 
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    Digg Science News

  • Up Close On Baseball’s Borders

    24 Apr 2014 | 11:35 am
    Using aggregated data provided by Facebook, we were able to create an unprecedented look at the geography of baseball fandom, going down not only to the county level, as Facebook did in a nationwide map it released a few weeks ago, but also to ZIP codes.
  • The Sharing Economy Isn’t About Trust, It’s About Desperation

    24 Apr 2014 | 11:34 am
    A huge precondition for the sharing economy has been a depressed labor market, in which lots of people are trying to fill holes in their income by monetizing their stuff and their labor in creative ways.
  • Where The U.S. Gets Its Clothing

    24 Apr 2014 | 11:34 am
    One year after a fatal factory collapse in Bangladesh, where are Americans getting their clothes? And how much do we know about conditions in the countries that make those clothes?
  • The Found Poetry Of Fieri’s Vegas Kitchen & Bar Menu

    24 Apr 2014 | 11:18 am
    The following poem is comprised of 10 of the exclamations from the Guy Fieri’s Vegas Kitchen & Bar menu. The sentences have been copied verbatim, except that their exclamation points have been replaced with other punctuation. I call it “Ode on a Gnarly Greek Salad.”
  • The Navy Wants A Carrier-Based Fighter Drone

    24 Apr 2014 | 11:18 am
    The U.S. Navy is close to the next phase of its plan to build squadrons of robotic “top guns,” carrier-based unmanned aircraft capable of collecting intelligence, watching for enemies, and bombing them if necessary.
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    Wired

  • Space Radiation Remains Major Hazard for Humans Going to Mars

    Adam Mann
    24 Apr 2014 | 3:30 am
    During a conference this week in Washington D.C., enthusiasts are attempting to rouse support for a manned mission to Mars sometime in the next two decades. NASA is there, as are many key players in the spaceflight community. But there continue to be major obstacles to manned Mars missions. A new study highlights one of […]
  • Science Graphic of the Week: 19th Century Shipwreck Found Near the Golden Gate Bridge

    Greg Miller
    24 Apr 2014 | 3:30 am
    On a foggy night in 1888, the passenger steamer City of Chester was headed out of San Francisco Bay when disaster struck. The 202-foot boat was rammed by a much larger steamer, the Oceanic, coming into the bay from Asia. Sixteen people died in the accident, and the City of Chester quickly sank to the bottom. This multibeam sonar image from NOAA is the first look at the steamer in well over a century.
  • Award-Winning Microscope Images Come to Life in Extraordinary Videos

    Betsy Mason
    23 Apr 2014 | 11:31 am
    The Nikon Small World photomicrography competition was expanded to include video three years ago, and the result has been an incredible look into living things on the microscopic scale. This year's winning video is a three-dimensional look through a 10-day-old quail embryo growing inside its egg.
  • Genetic Tricks Could Make Bionic Ears Hear Better

    Greg Miller
    23 Apr 2014 | 11:00 am
    Scientists have devised a strategy they hope will one day make bionic ears even sharper. The idea is to make neurons inside the cochlea sprout new branches and become more sensitive to signals from a cochlear implant.
  • A Map of Every Nuke-Scale Asteroid Strike From the Last Decade

    Adam Mann
    22 Apr 2014 | 10:16 am
    Though dinosaur-killing impacts are rare, large asteroids routinely hit the Earth. In the visualization above, you can see the location of 26 space rocks that slammed into our planet between 2000 and 2013, each releasing the energy of our most powerful nuclear weapons.
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    Neuromarketing

  • The World’s Top Persuaders, Inside Your Head

    Roger Dooley
    22 Apr 2014 | 6:01 am
    How would you like to do a mind-meld with some of the world’s top experts in psychology, persuasion, marketing, neuroscience and more? For free? I’ve got exciting news for my Neuromarketing readers! We’re still working on the mind-meld technology, but the next-best thing is available today: The Brainfluence Podcast. Every week, we’ll talk with experts [...]
  • Webs of Influence by Nathalie Nahai

    Roger Dooley
    21 Apr 2014 | 7:20 am
    Book Review: Webs of Influence: The Psychology of Online Persuasion by Nathalie Nahai I read a lot of marketing books, but it’s rare to find one that so closely matches my own interests. Nathalie Nahai’s Webs of Influence focuses on the intersection of web design and persuasion psychology. It’s safe to say that if you [...]
  • The Most Persuasive Website in the World and More – Roger’s Picks

    Roger Dooley
    18 Apr 2014 | 8:27 am
    It’s that time again, and we’ve got a diverse set of reading from around the web. Please share your own great find in a comment! Need more exposure? Austen Allred (@AustenAllred) tells you how in The Hacker’s Guide to Getting Press . This is a long, detailed post that could easily be turned into an ebook [...]
  • Why You Are a Complete Idiot If You Don’t Google Yourself

    Roger Dooley
    16 Apr 2014 | 10:37 am
    The other day, I read a story at Fast Company titled Why You Should Google Yourself And Not Feel Guilty About It. I agreed with the reasoning of the author, Lindsay Lavine (@lindsaylavine), but was slightly puzzled by the “guilty” part. The headline was underscored by the opening sentence, “Admit it. You’ve Googled yourself, and [...]
  • Repped: 30 Days to a Better Online Reputation by Andy Beal

    Roger Dooley
    15 Apr 2014 | 8:36 am
    Book Review: Repped: 30 Days to a Better Online Reputation by Andy Beal In these days of heavy business books laden with theory, we still encounter a few that are short, action-oriented, and eminently practical. Andy Beal’s Repped is one such book. Beal offers readers a 30-day program to evaluate a company or individual’s online [...]
 
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    Mind Hacks

  • Research Digest post #2

    tomstafford
    24 Apr 2014 | 8:39 am
    My time in the BPS Research Digest hotseat continues. Today’s post is about a lovely study by Stuart Ritchie and colleagues which uses a unique dataset to look at the effect of alcohol on cognitive function across the lifespan. Here’s the intro: The cognitive cost or benefit of booze depends on your genes, suggests a new study which uses a unique longitudinal data set. Inside the laboratory psychologists use a control group to isolate the effects of specific variables. But many important real world problems can’t be captured in the lab. Ageing is a good example: if we want…
  • Research Digest posts, #1: A self-fulfilling fallacy?

    tomstafford
    23 Apr 2014 | 1:26 am
    This week I will be blogging over at the BPS Research Digest. The Digest was written for over ten years by psychology-writer extraordinaire Christian Jarrett, and I’m one of a series of guest editors during the transition period to a new permanent editor. My first piece is now up, and here is the opening: Lady Luck is fickle, but many of us believe we can read her mood. A new study of one year’s worth of bets made via an online betting site shows that gamblers’ attempts to predict when their luck will turn has some unexpected consequences. Read the rest over at the digest,…
  • Why all babies love peekaboo

    tomstafford
    22 Apr 2014 | 1:53 am
    Peekaboo is a game played over the world, crossing language and cultural barriers. Why is it so universal? Perhaps because it’s such a powerful learning tool. One of us hides our eyes and then slowly reveals them. This causes peals of laughter from a baby, which causes us to laugh in turn. Then we do it again. And again. Peekaboo never gets old. Not only does my own infant daughter seem happy to do it for hours, but when I was young I played it with my mum (“you chuckled a lot!” she confirms by text message) and so on back through the generations. We are all born with unique…
  • A history of the mind in 25 parts

    vaughanbell
    21 Apr 2014 | 1:40 pm
    BBC Radio 4 has just kicked off a 25-part radio series called ‘In Search of Ourselves: A History of Psychology and the Mind’. Because the BBC are not very good at the internet, there are no podcasts – streaming audio only, and each episode disappears after seven days. Good to see the BBC are still on the cutting edge of 20th Century media. The series looks fantastic however and it aims to cover psychology, psychiatry, neuroscience and the diverse history of dealing with mental distress. The first episode is already online so worth tuning in while you can.   Link to In…
  • Detecting inner consciousness

    vaughanbell
    21 Apr 2014 | 9:01 am
    Mosaic has an excellent in-depth article on researchers who are trying to detect signs of consciousness in patients who have fallen into coma-like states. The piece meshes the work of neuroscientists Adrian Owen, Nicholas Schiff and Steven Laureys who are independently looking at how to detect signs of consciousness in unresponsive brain-injured patients. It’s an excellent piece and communicates the key difference between various states of poor response after brain injury that are crucial for making sense of the ‘consciousness in coma’ headlines. One of the key concepts is…
 
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    ScienceBlogs

  • New Labor Department rules to improve broken system for black lung prevention [The Pump Handle]

    Celeste Monforton, DrPH, MPH
    24 Apr 2014 | 8:41 am
    Labor Secretary Tom Perez announced yesterday a new regulation designed to reduce coal miners’ risk of developing coal mine dust lung disease (CMDLD).  I’ve written about these regulations many times, on both the need for them and the snail’s pace at which the White House’s Office of Information and Regulatory Affairs (OIRA) reviewed them. They are long overdue.  Depending on who you ask these new regulations have been in the works since 2009 (beginning of the Obama Administration), 1996 (following an advisory committee report and NIOSH recommendation) or as far back as 1991…
  • The Bottleneck Years by H.E.Taylor – Chapter 89 [A Few Things Ill Considered]

    coby
    24 Apr 2014 | 7:00 am
    The Bottleneck Years by H.E. Taylor Chapter 88 Table of Contents Chapter 90 Chapter 89 The Beating, June 24, 2060 I hadn’t spoken to Jon for 7 weeks. Quite frankly, I wasn’t looking forward to it. I didn’t know what his long term reaction would be to my asking about Mai Ling, but I suspected it wouldn’t be good. I called Haverfield at the designated time and was informed that Jon was in hospital. They wouldn’t say why. I called Bergmann, but he wasn’t in his office and I didn’t have a personal number. I left a message and began to prepare for the last…
  • Flame Challenge Finalists 2014: What Is Color? [Uncertain Principles]

    Chad Orzel
    24 Apr 2014 | 6:17 am
    The finalists for the 2014 “Flame Challenge” have been selected, three written entries and three visual entries. None of these is my entry, alas, but it was worth a shot. I watched the videos last night, and it was sort of interesting to compare what ended up working well with the test audience of 11-year-olds to the comments that I got. The main difference between what I did and what got picked wasn’t so much in the use of unfamiliar words (the thing that generated comments on my post), but in the use of 11-year-old humor. (To be honest, I kind of hate one of them, because…
  • An herbal medicine clinic at the Cleveland Clinic: Quackademia triumphant [Respectful Insolence]

    Orac
    24 Apr 2014 | 12:50 am
    I don’t recall if I’ve ever mentioned my connection with the Cleveland Clinic Foundation (CCF). I probably have, but just don’t remember it. Longtime readers might recall that I did my general surgery training at Case Western Reserve University at University Hospitals of Cleveland. Indeed, I did my PhD there as well in the Department of Physiology and Biophysics. Up the road less than a mile from UH is the Cleveland Clinic. As it turns out, during my stint in Physiology and Biophysics at CWRU, I happened to do a research rotation in a lab at the CCF, which lasted a few…
  • Michael Mann on Climate Change and Denialism [Greg Laden's Blog]

    Greg Laden
    23 Apr 2014 | 8:01 pm
    Great interview with Michael Mann on The Lang and O’Leary Exchange, CBC, on climate change, faux pause, denialism, policy, and politics.
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    NPR

  • Why Are We Spiteful, Even Though It Bites Us Back?

    23 Apr 2014 | 2:14 pm
    Most of us aren't as maleficent as the fairy in "Sleeping Beauty," but we're still apt to spite others, even at risk of harming ourselves. Psychologists are trying to figure out why.» E-Mail This
  • Scientists Pinpoint Source Of Antarctic 'Quack'

    23 Apr 2014 | 2:09 pm
    For decades, a mysterious quacking "bio-duck" has been heard roaming the waters of the Southern Ocean. Now scientists say the source is a whale.» E-Mail This
  • Blockbuster Trades Are Changing The Face Of Pharmaceuticals

    23 Apr 2014 | 1:01 pm
    Pharmaceutical companies are suddenly trading entire divisions the way sports teams swap players. Glaxo, Novartis and Ely Lily are all involved in a complicated deal announced Tuesday, and so far this year, five deals exceeding $2 billion have been announced. What's driving the deal-making?» E-Mail This
  • Music That Burns, Literally

    23 Apr 2014 | 9:33 am
    Take Beyonce. Take Sinatra. Take whomever you love and set them on fire — with a "Pyro Board." It plays music by pulsing the beats in flame, and when the singer hits a high note — stand back.» E-Mail This
  • Dirty Money: A Microbial Jungle Thrives In Your Wallet

    23 Apr 2014 | 4:40 am
    A look at the critters that live on money finds about 3,000 types of bacteria. Most are harmless. But researchers found traces of DNA from anthrax and drug-resistant pathogens, too.» E-Mail This
 
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    PLOS Biology: New Articles

  • Emergent Global Patterns of Ecosystem Structure and Function from a Mechanistic General Ecosystem Model

    Michael B. J. Harfoot et al.
    22 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Michael B. J. Harfoot, Tim Newbold, Derek P. Tittensor, Stephen Emmott, Jon Hutton, Vassily Lyutsarev, Matthew J. Smith, Jörn P. W. Scharlemann, Drew W. Purves Anthropogenic activities are causing widespread degradation of ecosystems worldwide, threatening the ecosystem services upon which all human life depends. Improved understanding of this degradation is urgently needed to improve avoidance and mitigation measures. One tool to assist these efforts is predictive models of ecosystem structure and function that are mechanistic: based on fundamental ecological principles. Here we present…
  • A Galactic View of Nature's Decontamination Squad

    Roland G. Roberts
    22 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Roland G. Roberts
  • Large-Scale Determination of Sequence, Structure, and Function Relationships in Cytosolic Glutathione Transferases across the Biosphere

    Susan T. Mashiyama et al.
    22 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Susan T. Mashiyama, M. Merced Malabanan, Eyal Akiva, Rahul Bhosle, Megan C. Branch, Brandan Hillerich, Kevin Jagessar, Jungwook Kim, Yury Patskovsky, Ronald D. Seidel, Mark Stead, Rafael Toro, Matthew W. Vetting, Steven C. Almo, Richard N. Armstrong, Patricia C. Babbitt The cytosolic glutathione transferase (cytGST) superfamily comprises more than 13,000 nonredundant sequences found throughout the biosphere. Their key roles in metabolism and defense against oxidative damage have led to thousands of studies over several decades. Despite this attention, little is known about the…
  • Modulation of STAT3 Folding and Function by TRiC/CCT Chaperonin

    Moses Kasembeli et al.
    22 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Moses Kasembeli, Wilson Chun Yu Lau, Soung-Hun Roh, T. Kris Eckols, Judith Frydman, Wah Chiu, David J. Tweardy Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (Stat3) transduces signals of many peptide hormones from the cell surface to the nucleus and functions as an oncoprotein in many types of cancers, yet little is known about how it achieves its native folded state within the cell. Here we show that Stat3 is a novel substrate of the ring-shaped hetero-oligomeric eukaryotic chaperonin, TRiC/CCT, which contributes to its biosynthesis and activity in vitro and in vivo. TRiC binding to…
  • Chronos: Stress Makes the Clock Tick

    Richard Robinson
    15 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Richard Robinson
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    PLOS Computational Biology: New Articles

  • The Influence of Spatiotemporal Structure of Noisy Stimuli in Decision Making

    Andrea Insabato et al.
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Andrea Insabato, Laura Dempere-Marco, Mario Pannunzi, Gustavo Deco, Ranulfo Romo Decision making is a process of utmost importance in our daily lives, the study of which has been receiving notable attention for decades. Nevertheless, the neural mechanisms underlying decision making are still not fully understood. Computational modeling has revealed itself as a valuable asset to address some of the fundamental questions. Biophysically plausible models, in particular, are useful in bridging the different levels of description that experimental studies provide, from the neural spiking…
  • A Synergism between Adaptive Effects and Evolvability Drives Whole Genome Duplication to Fixation

    Thomas D. Cuypers et al.
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Thomas D. Cuypers, Paulien Hogeweg Whole genome duplication has shaped eukaryotic evolutionary history and has been associated with drastic environmental change and species radiation. While the most common fate of WGD duplicates is a return to single copy, retained duplicates have been found enriched for highly interacting genes. This pattern has been explained by a neutral process of subfunctionalization and more recently, dosage balance selection. However, much about the relationship between environmental change, WGD and adaptation remains unknown. Here, we study the duplicate retention…
  • A Toolbox for Representational Similarity Analysis

    Hamed Nili et al.
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Hamed Nili, Cai Wingfield, Alexander Walther, Li Su, William Marslen-Wilson, Nikolaus Kriegeskorte Neuronal population codes are increasingly being investigated with multivariate pattern-information analyses. A key challenge is to use measured brain-activity patterns to test computational models of brain information processing. One approach to this problem is representational similarity analysis (RSA), which characterizes a representation in a brain or computational model by the distance matrix of the response patterns elicited by a set of stimuli. The representational distance matrix…
  • ISMB 2014—The Premier Conference for the World's Computational Biologists

    Christiana N. Fogg et al.
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Christiana N. Fogg, Diane E. Kovats
  • Phylogenetic Quantification of Intra-tumour Heterogeneity

    Roland F. Schwarz et al.
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Roland F. Schwarz, Anne Trinh, Botond Sipos, James D. Brenton, Nick Goldman, Florian Markowetz Intra-tumour genetic heterogeneity is the result of ongoing evolutionary change within each cancer. The expansion of genetically distinct sub-clonal populations may explain the emergence of drug resistance, and if so, would have prognostic and predictive utility. However, methods for objectively quantifying tumour heterogeneity have been missing and are particularly difficult to establish in cancers where predominant copy number variation prevents accurate phylogenetic reconstruction owing to…
 
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    PLOS Genetics: New Articles

  • Three Groups of Transposable Elements with Contrasting Copy Number Dynamics and Host Responses in the Maize (Zea mays ssp. mays) Genome

    Concepcion M. Diez et al.
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Concepcion M. Diez, Esteban Meca, Maud I. Tenaillon, Brandon S. Gaut Most angiosperm nuclear DNA is repetitive and derived from silenced transposable elements (TEs). TE silencing requires substantial resources from the plant host, including the production of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs). Thus, the interaction between TEs and siRNAs is a critical aspect of both the function and the evolution of plant genomes. Yet the co-evolutionary dynamics between these two entities remain poorly characterized. Here we studied the organization of TEs within the maize (Zea mays ssp mays) genome,…
  • Analysis of the Genome and Transcriptome of Cryptococcus neoformans var. grubii Reveals Complex RNA Expression and Microevolution Leading to Virulence Attenuation

    Guilhem Janbon et al.
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Guilhem Janbon, Kate L. Ormerod, Damien Paulet, Edmond J. Byrnes, Vikas Yadav, Gautam Chatterjee, Nandita Mullapudi, Chung-Chau Hon, R. Blake Billmyre, François Brunel, Yong-Sun Bahn, Weidong Chen, Yuan Chen, Eve W. L. Chow, Jean-Yves Coppée, Anna Floyd-Averette, Claude Gaillardin, Kimberly J. Gerik, Jonathan Goldberg, Sara Gonzalez-Hilarion, Sharvari Gujja, Joyce L. Hamlin, Yen-Ping Hsueh, Giuseppe Ianiri, Steven Jones, Chinnappa D. Kodira, Lukasz Kozubowski, Woei Lam, Marco Marra, Larry D. Mesner, Piotr A. Mieczkowski, Frédérique Moyrand, Kirsten Nielsen, Caroline Proux, Tristan…
  • Mouse Pulmonary Adenoma Susceptibility 1 Locus Is an Expression QTL Modulating Kras-4A

    Alice Dassano et al.
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Alice Dassano, Francesca Colombo, Gaia Trincucci, Elisa Frullanti, Antonella Galvan, Angela Pettinicchio, Loris De Cecco, Andrea Borrego, Olga Célia Martinez Ibañez, Tommaso A. Dragani, Giacomo Manenti Pulmonary adenoma susceptibility 1 (Pas1) is the major locus responsible for lung tumor susceptibility in mice; among the six genes mapping in this locus, Kras is considered the best candidate for Pas1 function although how it determines tumor susceptibility remains unknown. In an (A/J×C57BL/6)F4 intercross population treated with urethane to induce lung tumors, Pas1 not only modulated…
  • Evolutionarily Diverged Regulation of X-chromosomal Genes as a Primal Event in Mouse Reproductive Isolation

    Ayako Oka et al.
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Ayako Oka, Toyoyuki Takada, Hironori Fujisawa, Toshihiko Shiroishi Improper gene regulation is implicated in reproductive isolation, but its genetic and molecular bases are unknown. We previously reported that a mouse inter-subspecific X chromosome substitution strain shows reproductive isolation characterized by male-specific sterility due to disruption of meiotic entry in spermatogenesis. Here, we conducted comprehensive transcriptional profiling of the testicular cells of this strain by microarray. The results clearly revealed gross misregulation of gene expression in the substituted…
  • A Synthetic Community Approach Reveals Plant Genotypes Affecting the Phyllosphere Microbiota

    Natacha Bodenhausen et al.
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Natacha Bodenhausen, Miriam Bortfeld-Miller, Martin Ackermann, Julia A. Vorholt The identity of plant host genetic factors controlling the composition of the plant microbiota and the extent to which plant genes affect associated microbial populations is currently unknown. Here, we use a candidate gene approach to investigate host effects on the phyllosphere community composition and abundance. To reduce the environmental factors that might mask genetic factors, the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana was used in a gnotobiotic system and inoculated with a reduced complexity synthetic bacterial…
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    PLOS Pathogens: New Articles

  • In Vivo Ligands of MDA5 and RIG-I in Measles Virus-Infected Cells

    Simon Runge et al.
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Simon Runge, Konstantin M. J. Sparrer, Charlotte Lässig, Katharina Hembach, Alina Baum, Adolfo García-Sastre, Johannes Söding, Karl-Klaus Conzelmann, Karl-Peter Hopfner RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs: RIG-I, MDA5 and LGP2) play a major role in the innate immune response against viral infections and detect patterns on viral RNA molecules that are typically absent from host RNA. Upon RNA binding, RLRs trigger a complex downstream signaling cascade resulting in the expression of type I interferons and proinflammatory cytokines. In the past decade extensive efforts were made to elucidate the…
  • The Expanding Functions of Cellular Helicases: The Tombusvirus RNA Replication Enhancer Co-opts the Plant eIF4AIII-Like AtRH2 and the DDX5-Like AtRH5 DEAD-Box RNA Helicases to Promote Viral Asymmetric RNA Replication

    Nikolay Kovalev et al.
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Nikolay Kovalev, Peter D. Nagy Replication of plus-strand RNA viruses depends on recruited host factors that aid several critical steps during replication. Several of the co-opted host factors bind to the viral RNA, which plays multiple roles, including mRNA function, as an assembly platform for the viral replicase (VRC), template for RNA synthesis, and encapsidation during infection. It is likely that remodeling of the viral RNAs and RNA-protein complexes during the switch from one step to another requires RNA helicases. In this paper, we have discovered a second group of cellular RNA…
  • Exposure-Dependent Control of Malaria-Induced Inflammation in Children

    Silvia Portugal et al.
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Silvia Portugal, Jacqueline Moebius, Jeff Skinner, Safiatou Doumbo, Didier Doumtabe, Younoussou Kone, Seydou Dia, Kishore Kanakabandi, Daniel E. Sturdevant, Kimmo Virtaneva, Stephen F. Porcella, Shanping Li, Ogobara K. Doumbo, Kassoum Kayentao, Aissata Ongoiba, Boubacar Traore, Peter D. Crompton In malaria-naïve individuals, Plasmodium falciparum infection results in high levels of parasite-infected red blood cells (iRBCs) that trigger systemic inflammation and fever. Conversely, individuals in endemic areas who are repeatedly infected are often asymptomatic and have low levels of iRBCs,…
  • Kind Discrimination and Competitive Exclusion Mediated by Contact-Dependent Growth Inhibition Systems Shape Biofilm Community Structure

    Melissa S. Anderson et al.
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Melissa S. Anderson, Erin C. Garcia, Peggy A. Cotter Contact-Dependent Growth Inhibition (CDI) is a phenomenon in which bacteria use the toxic C-terminus of a large exoprotein (called BcpA in Burkholderia species) to inhibit the growth of neighboring bacteria upon cell-cell contact. CDI systems are present in a wide range of Gram-negative proteobacteria and a hallmark feature is polymorphism amongst the exoprotein C-termini (BcpA-CT in Burkholderia) and amongst the small immunity proteins (BcpI) that protect against CDI in an allele-specific manner. In addition to CDI, the BcpAIOB proteins…
  • Deficient IFN Signaling by Myeloid Cells Leads to MAVS-Dependent Virus-Induced Sepsis

    Amelia K. Pinto et al.
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Amelia K. Pinto, Hilario J. Ramos, Xiaobo Wu, Shilpa Aggarwal, Bimmi Shrestha, Matthew Gorman, Kristin Y. Kim, Mehul S. Suthar, John P. Atkinson, Michael Gale Jr, Michael S. Diamond The type I interferon (IFN) signaling response limits infection of many RNA and DNA viruses. To define key cell types that require type I IFN signaling to orchestrate immunity against West Nile virus (WNV), we infected mice with conditional deletions of the type I IFN receptor (IFNAR) gene. Deletion of the Ifnar gene in subsets of myeloid cells resulted in uncontrolled WNV replication, vasoactive cytokine…
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    PLOS ONE Alerts: New Articles

  • The Use of Contrast-Enhanced Post Mortem CT in the Detection of Cardiovascular Deaths

    Jonas Christoph Apitzsch et al.
    23 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Jonas Christoph Apitzsch, Saskia Westphal, Tobias Penzkofer, Christiane Katharina Kuhl, Ruth Knüchel, Andreas H. Mahnken Objectives To evaluate the diagnostic value of contrast enhanced post mortem computed tomography (PMCT) in comparison to non-enhanced post mortem CT in the detection of cardiovascular causes of death (COD). Background As autopsy rates decline, new methods to determine CODs are necessary. So contrast enhanced PMCT shall be evaluated in comparison to established non-enhanced PMCT in order to further improve the method. Methods In a prospective study, 20 corpses were…
  • T Cell Contamination in Flow Cytometry Gating Approaches for Analysis of Innate Lymphoid Cells

    Sara H. Burkhard et al.
    23 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Sara H. Burkhard, Florian Mair, Kathrin Nussbaum, Sabrina Hasler, Burkhard Becher Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) differ from T and B cells as they do not express genetically rearranged antigen receptors. The most prominent member of this group, NK cells, can be identified by numerous surface receptors such as natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs). However, novel groups of ILCs have recently been described and classified based on fate-determining transcription factors and cytokines being produced, similarly to T helper cells. Due to the lack of exclusive markers, ILCs are primarily defined by…
  • Have Historical Climate Changes Affected Gentoo Penguin (Pygoscelis papua) Populations in Antarctica?

    Fabiola Peña M. et al.
    23 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Fabiola Peña M., Elie Poulin, Gisele P. M. Dantas, Daniel González-Acuña, Maria Virginia Petry, Juliana A. Vianna The West Antarctic Peninsula (WAP) has been suffering an increase in its atmospheric temperature during the last 50 years, mainly associated with global warming. This increment of temperature trend associated with changes in sea-ice dynamics has an impact on organisms, affecting their phenology, physiology and distribution range. For instance, rapid demographic changes in Pygoscelis penguins have been reported over the last 50 years in WAP, resulting in population expansion…
  • Distinct Cell Clusters Touching Islet Cells Induce Islet Cell Replication in Association with Over-Expression of Regenerating Gene (REG) Protein in Fulminant Type 1 Diabetes

    Kaoru Aida et al.
    23 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Kaoru Aida, Sei Saitoh, Yoriko Nishida, Sadanori Yokota, Shinichi Ohno, Xiayang Mao, Daiichiro Akiyama, Shoichiro Tanaka, Takuya Awata, Akira Shimada, Youichi Oikawa, Hiroki Shimura, Fumihiko Furuya, Soichi Takizawa, Masashi Ichijo, Sayaka Ichijo, Jun Itakura, Hideki Fujii, Akinori Hashiguchi, Shin Takasawa, Toyoshi Endo, Tetsuro Kobayashi Background Pancreatic islet endocrine cell-supporting architectures, including islet encapsulating basement membranes (BMs), extracellular matrix (ECM), and possible cell clusters, are unclear. Procedures The architectures around islet cell clusters,…
  • Incidence of TB and HIV in Prospectively Followed Household Contacts of TB Index Patients in South Africa

    Cari van Schalkwyk et al.
    23 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Cari van Schalkwyk, Ebrahim Variava, Adrienne E. Shapiro, Modiehi Rakgokong, Katlego Masonoke, Limakatso Lebina, Alex Welte, Neil Martinson Objective To report the incidence rates of TB and HIV in household contacts of index patients diagnosed with TB. Design A prospective cohort study in the Matlosana sub-district of North West Province, South Africa. Methods Contacts of index TB patients received TB and HIV testing after counseling at their first household visit and were then followed up a year later, in 2010. TB or HIV diagnoses that occurred during the period were determined. Results…
 
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    PLOS Medicine: New Articles

  • Optimal Evidence in Difficult Settings: Improving Health Interventions and Decision Making in Disasters

    Martin Gerdin et al.
    22 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Martin Gerdin, Mike Clarke, Claire Allen, Bonnix Kayabu, William Summerskill, Declan Devane, Malcolm MacLachlan, Paul Spiegel, Anjan Ghosh, Rony Zachariah, Saurabh Gupta, Virginia Barbour, Virginia Murray, Johan von Schreeb
  • Fetal Growth and Risk of Stillbirth: A Population-Based Case–Control Study

    Radek Bukowski et al.
    22 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Radek Bukowski, Nellie I. Hansen, Marian Willinger, Uma M. Reddy, Corette B. Parker, Halit Pinar, Robert M. Silver, Donald J. Dudley, Barbara J. Stoll, George R. Saade, Matthew A. Koch, Carol J. Rowland Hogue, Michael W. Varner, Deborah L. Conway, Donald Coustan, Robert L. Goldenberg, for the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development Stillbirth Collaborative Research Network Background Stillbirth is strongly related to impaired fetal growth. However, the relationship between fetal growth and stillbirth is difficult to determine because of uncertainty…
  • Burden of Total and Cause-Specific Mortality Related to Tobacco Smoking among Adults Aged ≥45 Years in Asia: A Pooled Analysis of 21 Cohorts

    Wei Zheng et al.
    22 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Wei Zheng, Dale F. McLerran, Betsy A. Rolland, Zhenming Fu, Paolo Boffetta, Jiang He, Prakash Chandra Gupta, Kunnambath Ramadas, Shoichiro Tsugane, Fujiko Irie, Akiko Tamakoshi, Yu-Tang Gao, Woon-Puay Koh, Xiao-Ou Shu, Kotaro Ozasa, Yoshikazu Nishino, Ichiro Tsuji, Hideo Tanaka, Chien-Jen Chen, Jian-Min Yuan, Yoon-Ok Ahn, Keun-Young Yoo, Habibul Ahsan, Wen-Harn Pan, You-Lin Qiao, Dongfeng Gu, Mangesh Suryakant Pednekar, Catherine Sauvaget, Norie Sawada, Toshimi Sairenchi, Gong Yang, Renwei Wang, Yong-Bing Xiang, Waka Ohishi, Masako Kakizaki, Takashi Watanabe, Isao Oze, San-Lin You, Yumi…
  • A Physicians' Wish List for the Clinical Application of Intestinal Metagenomics

    Ingeborg Klymiuk et al.
    15 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Ingeborg Klymiuk, Christoph Högenauer, Bettina Halwachs, Gerhard G. Thallinger, W. Florian Fricke, Christoph Steininger
  • Fialuridine Induces Acute Liver Failure in Chimeric TK-NOG Mice: A Model for Detecting Hepatic Drug Toxicity Prior to Human Testing

    Dan Xu et al.
    15 Apr 2014 | 2:00 pm
    by Dan Xu, Toshi Nishimura, Sachiko Nishimura, Haili Zhang, Ming Zheng, Ying-Ying Guo, Marylin Masek, Sara A. Michie, Jeffrey Glenn, Gary Peltz Background Seven of 15 clinical trial participants treated with a nucleoside analogue (fialuridine [FIAU]) developed acute liver failure. Five treated participants died, and two required a liver transplant. Preclinical toxicology studies in mice, rats, dogs, and primates did not provide any indication that FIAU would be hepatotoxic in humans. Therefore, we investigated whether FIAU-induced liver toxicity could be detected in chimeric TK-NOG mice with…
 
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    Reuters

  • With genome deciphered, experts aim to swat dreaded tsetse fly

    24 Apr 2014 | 11:18 am
    WASHINGTON (Reuters) - An international team of scientists has deciphered the genetic code of the tsetse fly, the bloodsucking insect that spreads deadly African sleeping sickness, with the hope that its biological secrets can be exploited to eradicate this malady.
  • NASA tries space kits to engage kids in science and space

    24 Apr 2014 | 11:12 am
    NEW YORK (Reuters) - Making mini satellite dishes that collect signals or building remote-controlled mini Rovers such as the kind NASA has used on Mars are the types of activities that could interest kids in science, but their complexity can derail all but the most enthusiastic hobbyist.
  • Drop in population of Gulf of Maine baby lobsters puzzles scientists

    23 Apr 2014 | 2:54 pm
    BOWDOINHAM, Maine (Reuters) - The number of baby lobsters in the Gulf of Maine has dropped by half since 2007, a phenomenon that has puzzled scientists as the population of adult lobsters remains near a record high, contributing to robust catches.
  • Spacewalkers to replace failed computer outside space station

    23 Apr 2014 | 7:35 am
    CAPE CANAVERAL, Florida (Reuters) - Two U.S. astronauts floated outside the International Space Station on Wednesday to replace a failed computer that serves as a backup to critical control systems, including the outpost's solar panel wings.
  • Study in Europe eclipses notion home in the sun equals happiness

    23 Apr 2014 | 6:32 am
    LONDON (Reuters) - Sun seekers who leave northern Europe for warmer climes are marginally less happy than those left behind, a study found.
 
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    Sciencetext Tech Talk

  • LastPass saves you from HeartBleed

    David Bradley
    14 Apr 2014 | 1:53 am
    If you sensibly use a password manager, whether an online (LastPass) or offline (KeyPass) tool you will probably have heard of the security bug that was uncovered in OpenSSL, the encryption system that underpins security on countless websites. The bug, which goes by the catchy name of HeartBleed, has now been demonstrated as problematic for much of the web and the recommendation is that you change your passwords urgently. But, how do you know which site to reset first? Lastpass has usefully added a scan to their security tools that will work through all your registered logins and tell you…
  • WolframAlpha gets all in your Facebook

    David Bradley
    5 Mar 2014 | 9:30 am
    I heard about this tool many years ago, but they recently updated it and now WolframAlpha can analyze your Facebook profile. It throws up lots of interesting data about how many photos you’ve posted, how many tags, likes and all that stuff. It also gives you a breakdown of the demographic of your circle of friends. It turns out that my friends Mike and Dek are well into their 100s (fake birthdays methinks!). There’s nobody I know on Facebook in their 90s, but I do have three friends who are genuinely in their 80s. Nice one! By some weird coincidence 43% percent of my Facebook…
  • The digital activist

    David Bradley
    1 Mar 2014 | 10:47 am
    It’s perhaps not surprising that the advent of free information and communication channels has opened up easier routes to activist activity, whether in the consumer, political, environmental, patient advocacy and many other areas. Now, Vivek Shah, Marcos Sivitanides and Mayur Mehta of Texas State University, in San Marcos, USA, have laid down a framework for research into the online, technologically driven form of social activism we might call digital activism. Writing in the International Journal of Information Technology, Communications and Convergence, the three specialists in…
  • Who not to follow back

    David Bradley
    19 Feb 2014 | 9:50 am
    When you’ve been on Twitter a while, you get a feeling for who not to follow back. I encapsulated my thinking in a twitter flowchart some time ago, but also having scanned recent new followers it made sense just to mock a profile (name changed) to show you what to look out for: The warning signs are any combination of the following: default “egg” avatar, default header background image, no bio, misspelled username, username with silly number at the end, no tweets, very few followers but following a huge number of accounts. Maybe one or two of these alone is fine, not…
  • Getting more out of your laptop display

    David Bradley
    13 Feb 2014 | 12:10 am
    Ever since I switched down to a 15″ laptop (1366×768) from a 17″ (1600×900) I’ve been frustrated by the lower number of pixels that fit vertically on the screen, meaning more scrolling when web browsing…so…why has it only just occurred to me to reduce the font size in my browser to 90% to make more fit without losing readability? Post from: David Bradley's Sciencetext Tech TalkGetting more out of your laptop display Subscribe to our Email Newsletter Related Posts:Make any website comfortably readableMaking your lithium battery last longerKeeping your…
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    FlowingData

  • Detailed Map of Baseball Fandom

    Nathan Yau
    24 Apr 2014 | 9:50 am
    For the past couple of sports seasons, Facebook mapped the most liked team by county. They did it for football (NFL), the NCAA basketball tournament, and baseball (MLB). Although generalized, the maps provide a view of sports fandom and people clusters across the country, and plus you know, they're fun. The Upshot used the same like data, provided by Facebook, and mapped it at the ZIP code level. Then they took it a step further and looked closer at regional rivalries, such as Cubs and White Sox, Yankees and Red Sox, and Dodgers and Angels. Be sure to scroll down to Mets versus Phillies. They…
  • PourOver Allows Filtering of Large Datasets In Your Browser

    Nathan Yau
    24 Apr 2014 | 7:05 am
    The New York Times released PourOver, a library that lets you do database-like things client-side, so that (1) you, the developer, can worry less about database optimization and server loads and (2) users get a more responsive, faster experience. PourOver is built around the ideal of simple queries that can be arbitrarily composed with each other, without having to recalculate their results. You can union, intersect, and difference queries. PourOver will remember how your queries were constructed and can smartly update them when items are added or modified. You also get useful features like…
  • Where People Bike and Run, Worldwide

    Nathan Yau
    24 Apr 2014 | 2:52 am
    Remember those running maps I made with limited data from RunKeeper? Strava, which also provides an app to track your runs and bike rides, has a much more expansive version of popular paths around the world. Their dataset includes over 77 million rides and 19 million runs, summing to about 220 billion data points. Just pan and zoom to your area of interest, and there you go.
  • The Change My Son Brought, Seen Through Personal Data

    Nathan Yau
    23 Apr 2014 | 4:41 am
    My data point turned six months recently. It was a fast six months, and it was a slow six months. Some days I would play with him, look at my watch, and somehow the whole day past. Other days, especially in the beginning when I had little clue as to what to do, I counted some very long minutes. As you can imagine — and any parent can tell you this — my life changed the moment my son was born. In what ways? I'm glad you asked, because I was curious about that, too. My dissertation was on personal data collection, so I have data that goes back to 2008. I downloaded that data, which…
  • The Upshot, a data-centric site from The New York Times launched

    Nathan Yau
    22 Apr 2014 | 8:44 am
    We heard a little bit about The Upshot last month. Now we get to see it. From editor David Leonhardt on what the site is about: One of our highest priorities will be unearthing data sets — and analyzing existing ones — in ways that illuminate and explain the news. Our first day of material, both political and economic, should give you a sense of what we hope to do with data. As with our written articles, we aspire to present our data in the clearest, most engaging way possible. A graphic can often accomplish that goal better than prose. Luckily, we work alongside The Times's…
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    Science Daily

  • 'Double-duty' electrolyte enables new chemistry for longer-lived batteries

    24 Apr 2014 | 8:33 am
    Researchers have developed a new and unconventional battery chemistry aimed at producing batteries that last longer than previously thought possible. Researchers have challenged a long-held assumption that a battery's three main components -- the positive cathode, negative anode and ion-conducting electrolyte -- can play only one role in the device.
  • Small business owners not always worried about being treated fairly, researcher finds

    24 Apr 2014 | 8:33 am
    Fairness is not always the most important priority for small retailers. In an international study, researchers found that some small retailers are less concerned about whether they are treated fairly by business suppliers than other factors, such as cash flow and company survival. "It is presumed that fairness, however it is defined by individual businesses, is important to all businesses," one researcher said. "Our research challenges that presumption and reveals that the importance placed on fairness can vary greatly among retailers."
  • The blood preserved in the preserved relic pumpkin did not belong to Louis XVI

    24 Apr 2014 | 8:33 am
    The results of an international study indicate that the DNA recovered from the inside of a pumpkin, attributed so far to the French King Louis XVI, does not actually belong to the monarch, guillotined in 1793. Complete genome sequencing suggests that blood remains correspond to a male with brown eyes, instead of blue as Louis XVI had, and shorter.
  • Spiders in space weave a web of scientific inspiration for Spider-Man fans

    24 Apr 2014 | 8:30 am
    While spiders were busy spinning webs in space, researchers on Earth weaved their knowledge of this activity into educational materials to inspire and motivate students. Now, this free, Web-based guide is being re-released through Scholastic and Sony Pictures as curriculum for educators to leap on the excitement surrounding the release of the film, "The Amazing Spider-Man 2."
  • 'Tis the season: Be on the lookout for brown recluse spiders

    24 Apr 2014 | 8:27 am
    Warmer, spring weather has many of us getting out and becoming more active, and the brown recluse spider is no exception. Scientists shared 10 facts about the somewhat small, shy spider.
 
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    The Why Files

  • Fruit fly study finds long-term impact of sleep deprivation

    svmedaristwf
    17 Apr 2014 | 12:03 pm
    Fruit fly study finds long-term impact of sleep deprivation Fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. Shutterstock Most of us know more about sleeping babies than snoozin’ fruitflies, but most young animals need buckets of sleep. Today, a study published in Science offers a comprehensive picture of why newborns sleep so much, and what difference it makes — at least to a fruit fly. The goal “was to show that sleep early in development is required for normal structural growth of the brain,” says first author Matthew Kayser, a physician in the department of psychiatry at the…
  • Lies and liars: Can you catch them?

    svmedaristwf
    10 Apr 2014 | 1:27 pm
    Lies and liars: Can you catch them? ENLARGEOscar Pistorius at a bail hearing on Feb 20, 2013, in Pretoria, South Africa. Pistorius is accused of murdering his girlfriend, Reeva Steenkamp, on February 14, 2013. Pistorius, who faces a minimum of 25 years in prison if convicted of premeditated murder, is accused of lying by the prosecution. Cropped photo from original by Gallo Images / City Press / Herman Verwey at Flickr As sprinter Oscar Pistorius, charged with murdering his girlfriend a year ago, takes the witness stand in self-defense, we’re forced once again to do the impossible:…
  • The Age of Radiance

    svmedaristwf
    8 Apr 2014 | 10:43 pm
    The Age of Radiance The Epic Rise and Dramatic Fall of the Atomic Era Craig Nelson • Scribner, 2014, 438 pp. If you’ve read and reread the history of a century of physics, the atom bomb, and quantum theory, you yawn at the prospect of plowing the same ground one more time. And then you open The Age of Radiance and read the personal history of the fascinating characters who discovered X-rays, created radium, the first artificial element, and began to cope with the myriad mysteries and far-reaching implications of the discovery of atomic energy. Witness: The loves of Madame Curie,…
  • Fundamental facial expressions: are there really 21?

    svmedaristwf
    3 Apr 2014 | 9:34 am
    Fundamental facial expressions: are there really 21? All face photos this page courtesy of Ohio State University. For centuries, psychologists have studied six basic facial expressions: happy, angry, sad, surprised, fearful and disgusted. But as cognitive scientist Aleix Martinez of the Ohio State University studied those six, a heretical question flitted through his mind: Could the human face be capable of registering a much wider variety of emotions? “Something struck me as odd,” says Martinez, an associate professor of electrical and computer engineering. “Why would we…
  • Ancient filter-feeder was a “gentle giant”

    svmedaristwf
    27 Mar 2014 | 9:43 am
    Ancient filter-feeder was a “gentle giant” ENLARGE An artist’s conception of T. borealis in the ancient sea. Courtesy Jakob Vinther, University of Bristol, UK Extraordinary fossils from the northern tip of Greenland provide a better picture of a dynamic period in early animal life. The fossils date to 520 million years ago, shortly after the simple organic soup of the Precambrian epoch gave way to the explosive biodiversity of the Cambrian era. The fossil described in Nature this week is a filter feeder, one of the many aquatic animals that earn a living by “raking…
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    BBC

  • VIDEO: Film features plight of African park

    24 Apr 2014 | 3:22 am
    The lethal realities of life in Virunga National Park are the subject of a British documentary which has just had its world premiere at the Tribeca Film Festival in New York.
  • AUDIO: Migrant birds 'shot as trophies'

    22 Apr 2014 | 3:13 am
    Wildlife expert Chris Packham and Sergei Golovkin from Malta's Wild Birds Regulation Unit discuss the number of illegal bird hunters operating in Malta.
  • VIDEO: Water voles fighting back in Sussex

    19 Apr 2014 | 12:49 am
    The number of water voles has declined by a fifth in the UK since 2011, recent figures suggest. But in one small part of Sussex, the water vole is surviving as Roger Finn reports.
  • VIDEO: 'Most Earth-like planet yet' found

    17 Apr 2014 | 8:39 pm
    A planet that is close in size to the Earth and that could hold water on its surface has been identified by the Kepler telescope.
  • VIDEO: The end of the beard is nigh

    16 Apr 2014 | 3:05 am
    The end of the beard is nigh - not according to fashion stylists, but to evolutionary biologists.
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    PhysOrg

  • Genetic code of the deadly tsetse fly unraveled

    24 Apr 2014 | 12:00 pm
    Mining the genome of the disease-transmitting tsetse fly, researchers have revealed the genetic adaptions that allow it to have such unique biology and transmit disease to both humans and animals.
  • Study finds accelerated soil carbon loss, increasing the rate of climate change

    24 Apr 2014 | 12:00 pm
    Research published in Science today found that increased levels of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere cause soil microbes to produce more carbon dioxide, accelerating climate change.
  • Some corals adjusting to rising ocean temperatures, research says

    24 Apr 2014 | 12:00 pm
    To most people, 86-degree Fahrenheit water is pleasant for bathing and swimming. To most sea creatures, however, it's deadly. As climate change heats up ocean temperatures, the future of species such as coral, which provides sustenance and livelihoods to a billion people, is threatened.
  • Cosmic illusion revealed: Gravitational lens magnifies supernova

    24 Apr 2014 | 12:00 pm
    A team of researchers led by Robert Quimby at the Kavli Institute for the Physics and Mathematics of the Universe (Kavli IPMU) has announced the discovery of a galaxy that magnified a background, Type Ia supernova thirtyfold through gravitational lensing. This is the first example of strong gravitational lensing of a supernova confirms the team's previous explanation for the unusual properties of this supernova.
  • Untangling Brazil's controversial new forest code

    24 Apr 2014 | 12:00 pm
    Approved in 2012, Brazil's new Forest Code has few admirers. Agricultural interests argue that it threatens the livelihoods of farmers. Environmentalists counter that it imperils millions of hectares of forest, threatening to release the billions of tons of carbon they contain. A new study, co-authored by Woods Hole Research Center (WHRC) scientists Michael Coe, Marcia Macedo and Brazilian colleagues, published this week in Science, aims to clarify the new law. Entitled "Cracking Brazil's Forest Code," the article is the first to quantify the implications of recent changes to the Forest Code…
 
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    Science News Headlines - Yahoo News

  • Scientists discover new rare genetic brain disorder

    24 Apr 2014 | 11:36 am
    By Julie Steenhuysen CHICAGO (Reuters) - International teams of researchers using advanced gene sequencing technology have uncovered a single genetic mutation responsible for a rare brain disorder that may have stricken families in Turkey for some 400 years. The discovery of this genetic disorder, reported in two papers in the journal Cell, demonstrates the growing power of new tools to uncover the causes of diseases that previously stumped doctors. Besides bringing relief to affected families, who can now go through prenatal genetic testing in order to have children without the disorder, the…
  • Study links California drought to global warming

    24 Apr 2014 | 11:34 am
    WASHINGTON (AP) —     While researchers have sometimes connected weather extremes to man-made global warming, usually it's not done in real time. Now a study is asserting a link between climate change and both the intensifying California drought and the polar vortex blamed for a harsh winter that mercifully has just ended in many places.
  • To Fight Sleeping Sickness, Tsetse Fly Genome Decoded

    24 Apr 2014 | 11:32 am
    Scientists have sequenced the full genome of the tsetse fly, the blood-sucking pest that spreads deadly sleeping sickness in sub-Saharan Africa. "Our goal is to enhance the toolbox that will be available to scientists and communities who are under the pressure of dealing with this disease," lead researcher Serap Aksoy, an epidemiologist at Yale University, told Live Science. Sleeping sickness (also called nagana when it affects cattle) tends to come in epidemics, the last of which occurred during the 1990s, Aksoy said. A major goal, Aksoy said, was to bring together scientists from…
  • With genome deciphered, experts aim to swat dreaded tsetse fly

    24 Apr 2014 | 11:25 am
    By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - An international team of scientists has deciphered the genetic code of the tsetse fly, the bloodsucking insect that spreads deadly African sleeping sickness, with the hope that its biological secrets can be exploited to eradicate this malady. The findings announced on Thursday were the culmination of a multimillion dollar, decade-long effort involving more than 140 scientists from 78 research institutions in 18 countries. The fly's bite carries a parasitic microorganism that causes sleeping sickness in people in sub-Saharan Africa and a form of the…
  • With genome deciphered, experts aim to swat dreaded tsetse fly

    24 Apr 2014 | 11:17 am
    By Will Dunham WASHINGTON (Reuters) - An international team of scientists has deciphered the genetic code of the tsetse fly, the bloodsucking insect that spreads deadly African sleeping sickness, with the hope that its biological secrets can be exploited to eradicate this malady. The findings announced on Thursday were the culmination of a multimillion dollar, decade-long effort involving more than 140 scientists from 78 research institutions in 18 countries. The fly's bite carries a parasitic microorganism that causes sleeping sickness in people in sub-Saharan Africa and a form of the…
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    Science: This Week's News

  • [News & Analysis] Neurodegeneration: Potential Alzheimer's Drug Spurs Protein Recycling

    Ken Garber
    24 Apr 2014 | 5:00 pm
    By stabilizing the components of retromers, molecular complexes that act like recycling bins in cells, a recently identified compound could slow or stop the implacable spread of a protein fragment called β amyloid, a likely culprit in neuron death in Alzheimer's disease. The work builds on growing evidence that retromer dysfunction plays a role in the neurodegenerative disorder. Although the research on the possible small molecule drug is preliminary—so far the published work has only been done in cells—the new results have nonetheless impressed some veterans of the Alzheimer's field.
  • [News of the Week] Around the World

    Stewart Wills (mailto:swills@aaas.org)
    24 Apr 2014 | 5:00 pm
    In science news around the world, the European Space Agency's new environmental satellite Sentinel-1A sends back its first radar images of Earth, polio spreads farther into Central Africa, China releases new information on its polluted soil, and more.
  • [News of the Week] This Week's Section

    Stewart Wills (mailto:swills@aaas.org)
    24 Apr 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Follow the links below for a roundup of the week's top stories in science, or download a PDF of the entire section. Around the WorldFindingsRandom SamplesNewsmakers
  • [News of the Week] Random Sample

    Stewart Wills (mailto:swills@aaas.org)
    24 Apr 2014 | 5:00 pm
    NASA's Cassini spacecraft spies a new moon forming in Saturn's outermost ring, which scientists hope will offer insight into the formation of the planet's other icy moons within its now-vanished, even more massive rings.
  • [News Focus] After the Deluge

    Dennis Normile
    24 Apr 2014 | 5:00 pm
    Researchers are gaining insights into what made Supertyphoon Haiyan so powerful and devastating through post-storm surveys and analyses. The tropical cyclone's ferocity resulted from a buildup of heat in subsurface waters in the western North Pacific; the devastating surge was a quirk of geography in which a narrow bay funneled water toward the heavily populated city of Tacloban. There is no obvious link to global warming. But scientists warn that reducing the toll from future storms will depend on moving residents and buildings away from vulnerable coastlines. Author: Dennis Normile
 
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    Nerdy Science Blog

  • The Health Risks of Wearing A Bra

    theghostwriter
    12 Apr 2014 | 8:23 pm
    Recent research studies have shown that women might actually be putting their health at risk by wearing a bra. As shocking as this may sound, it is true. What sort of health risks are we talking about? Well, women who wear a bra have been found to be more prone to suffer from frequent breast pain, and even breast cancer in the long run. Research based evidence The one thing that needs to be mentioned here is that there is growing evidence that women who belong to cultures that do not deem it necessary for them to wear bras do not largely suffer from breast cancer. A number of researches have…
  • The Health Benefits of Bra

    theghostwriter
    29 Mar 2014 | 7:09 pm
    With the passage of time, experts have come to the conclusion that the breasts of a woman continue to change sizes all through life. On average, it is believed by experts that breasts have the potential to change sizes an average of five times throughout the life of a woman. What would that mean for a woman? Well, to begin with, this means that the bra that you are wearing at the moment will not be a perfect fit in years to come. You would need to purchase a new bra to make sure that it fits you well. If truth be told, all this can easily happen in just a year’s time so you need to keep an…
  • Who Invented The First Bra?

    theghostwriter
    15 Mar 2014 | 7:08 pm
    Bras, as we all know, are commonly worn by women across the world. However, what do we know about this clothing item’s history? Who invented it? Well, let’s help you learn about its history a bit. The very first modern brassiere to have ever received a patent was the one that was invented by Mary Phelps Jacob, a New York socialite in the year 1913. Details about the invention of bras The events that lead to the invention of the first bra are rather interesting. What basically happened is that Mary Phelps Jacob had recently bought an exquisite looking evening gown that she wanted to wear…
  • Cats vs Dogs Superpower: Ultraviolet Vision

    WTJ
    22 Feb 2014 | 7:25 pm
    When I read the report that house pets are able to see UV lights that human can’t see, I immediately thought of howling dogs.  One of the superstitious belief that dogs cried when they see or sense supernatural figure, such as ghosts or spirits.  Although scientists believe that dogs howl to have long-range communication with other dogs, it is also proven they howl because of anxiety. Back to the topic, with the ‘superpower’ of seeing ultraviolet wavelengths, the house pets are able to see dried puddles or urine (or sperm stain) which are usually used by animals in marking…
  • First Dinosaur Fossil Found in Malaysia

    WTJ
    22 Feb 2014 | 12:44 am
    Scientists from University of Malaya, Waseda University and Kumamoto University unveiled a 75 million-year-old tooth in the central state of Pahang, Malaysia.  The one inch long Spinosaurid tooth is the first dinosaur fossil found in Malaysia after digging for nearly two years.  The Spinosaurids are fish-eating predator and their fossils have been found in Africa, Asia, Australia, Europe, and South America. (news)
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    Bitesize Bio

  • Learning from Nature: Biomimicry

    Mariyam Abdullah Johar
    23 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    Man, in all his intelligence and arrogance, has been struggling for years to find solutions to hundreds of little problems from ‘How to conserve water’ to ‘How to cool our environment naturally.’ If only we could take our noses out of our complex problems, we would see that the solutions are staring us in the face all the time. Literally! Luckily, some very ingenious scientists are doing just that. Termites: architectural geniuses Have you ever faced times when the summer is at its peak and the power goes out? And along with the power goes the air conditioning? Well, a small group of…
  • What is Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy?

    Catriona Paul
    22 Apr 2014 | 3:00 am
    Fluorescent microscopy not only makes our images look good, it also allows us to gain a better understanding of cells, structures and tissue. With confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) we can find out even more. CLSM combines high-resolution optical imaging with depth selectivity which allows us to do optical sectioning. This means that we can view visual sections of tiny structures that would be difficult to physically section (e.g. embryos) and construct 3-D structures from the obtained images. Where it came from The principal of confocal microscopy was patented by Marvin Minsky in 1957…
  • Introducing CyTOF: Cytometry of the Masses

    Tim Bushnell
    22 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    Flow cytometry remains unparalleled as a single-cell analysis technology.  The ability to analyze 14 or more fluorescent parameters on a million cells or more allows for detailed understanding of complex biological processes. One limitation of flow cytometry is the reliance on fluorescent tags.   Even with careful panel design, loss of resolution occurs because issues including autofluorescence and spectral spillover cannot easily be avoided.   The greater the number of fluorochromes used, the larger these problems become magnified. To overcome this issue, a new method of detecting…
  • An Easy Way to Start Using R in Your Research: Exploratory Data Analysis

    jeremy chacon
    21 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    As you’ve probably kind of guessed from our previous articles Introducng R and the Basic R Tutorial, we think R programming language and R-studio are great tools for data analysis and figure production.  And now we are about to prove it! So, you’ve collected some data and are pretty sure you know what statistical test you wish to do on it (you did think about this when designing the experiment, right? Right?). But first, you want to take a look at the data, get a good feel for it and make sure you can proceed with confidence. Time for some exploratory data analysis! Last time in our…
  • Western Blot, ELISA or PCR; which technique should I use?

    Ellen Moran
    17 Apr 2014 | 2:54 am
    A pretty standard experiment in a molecular biology laboratory is where a scientist stimulates some cells/tissue with a stimulus of interest i.e. cytokine. They can then analyse the cellular response to the external stimulus and investigate what intracellular signalling pathways have been activated/deactivated or what proteins have been secreted from the cell as a result. There are a number of different methods that can used to analyse such responses. The most appropriate method depends on what aspect of the response being analysed and what questions you are asking as a researcher. The…
 
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    PHD Comics

  • 04/21/14 PHD comic: 'An Honest Methods Section'

    22 Apr 2014 | 9:30 pm
    Piled Higher & Deeper by Jorge Cham www.phdcomics.com title: "An Honest Methods Section" - originally published 4/21/2014 For the latest news in PHD Comics, CLICK HERE!
  • 04/18/14 PHD comic: 'Productivity'

    19 Apr 2014 | 12:41 am
    Piled Higher & Deeper by Jorge Cham www.phdcomics.com title: "Productivity" - originally published 4/18/2014 For the latest news in PHD Comics, CLICK HERE!
  • 04/14/14 PHD comic: 'Talking to Mom'

    16 Apr 2014 | 12:29 pm
    Piled Higher & Deeper by Jorge Cham www.phdcomics.com title: "Talking to Mom" - originally published 4/14/2014 For the latest news in PHD Comics, CLICK HERE!
  • 04/09/14 PHD comic: 'Defending'

    12 Apr 2014 | 2:26 am
    Piled Higher & Deeper by Jorge Cham www.phdcomics.com title: "Defending" - originally published 4/9/2014 For the latest news in PHD Comics, CLICK HERE!
  • 04/07/14 PHD comic: 'Announcement'

    8 Apr 2014 | 12:10 pm
    Piled Higher & Deeper by Jorge Cham www.phdcomics.com title: "Announcement" - originally published 4/7/2014 For the latest news in PHD Comics, CLICK HERE!
 
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    Science

  • Big pharma deals important to R&D

    24 Apr 2014 | 10:20 am
    Three separate public-private partnerships involving GlaxoSmithKline and AstraZeneca will bring millions of pounds to biomedical laboratories
  • Funds infusion planned for cyber security

    24 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    Groups unite in contributing $3m to open source encryption project after funding gap left websites exposed to Heartbleed attack and crisis
  • Pharma needs research, not cuts

    23 Apr 2014 | 10:32 am
    If the entire industry adopted Valeant’s approach, drug discovery would grind to a halt
  • China’s car lobby warns foreign brands

    22 Apr 2014 | 9:12 am
    Foreign invested joint ventures should have their own research and development capabilities and reduce reliance on overseas technology, says Dong Yang
  • Embryonic stem cells cloned from adults

    17 Apr 2014 | 9:35 am
    Skin cells from two men turned into embryos using the somatic cell nuclear transfer technology that produced Dolly the sheep in 1996
 
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    Scienceray

  • Home Improvement News: Five Simple Tips to Prepare Your Home for Flood Season

    17 Apr 2014 | 3:03 pm
    (BPT) – After a winter of frigid temperatures and record snowfalls, the nation now faces the spring thaw and long, rainy months. Flood season is officially here – is your home ready for it? Floods are the most common natural disaster in the United States. Over the past five years, the average flood insurance claim was more than $35,000, according to FEMA.gov. If you or someone you know has ever experienced a flood, you know that cleanup can require a massive effort. The best defense against flooding is a proactive approach. Consider these flood tips to prepare your home and family…
  • Conservation Alert: Let’s End Extinction

    12 Apr 2014 | 8:27 pm
    Let’s End Extinction (Family Features) Can you imagine a world without wildlife? From the largest trees to the smallest insects, nature is critical to man’s survival. Without forests there would be no air to breath; without insects there would be no fruits and vegetables to eat. The earth is a delicate ecosystem, and it’s up to mankind to make choices for sustaining and improving the environment. One choice is to partner with a trusted and reputable leader in conservation. Leading the fight against extinction One such organization is San Diego Zoo Global, which is dedicated…
  • Make Every Day Earth Day: Tips for Being an Eco-conscious Consumer

    31 Mar 2014 | 5:10 pm
    (Family Features) Whether stopping in for a daily to-go cup of coffee or running your weekly grocery store trip, you likely have many purchases throughout the day. With Earth Day right around the corner, it’s a great time to reflect on your own personal impact on the environment and the world around you. Because so many consumer habits can have a negative effect on the planet, it’s important to take steps to reduce this trend. “There are many ways to support the green movement,” said Hillary Femal, vice president of marketing for IFCO, the world’s leading…
  • Homeowner Alert: Your Home Could be Attracting Termites

    16 Mar 2014 | 12:54 am
    Termites live up to their nickname of the “silent destroyer” very well as they can munch away at your home, virtually undetected. And, it’s not just the critical support beams that they feed on. Termites can chew up floors, walls and even wallpaper. According to a study by the National Pest Management Association, termites cost U.S. homeowners approximately $5 billion in damage, which is not typically covered by homeowners insurance. Worker termite (Photo credit: Wikipedia) Early spring is a critical time to be on the lookout for termite infestations. When the ground warms…
  • Homeowner News: Are Ice Dams Damaging Your Home?

    14 Mar 2014 | 1:45 am
    (Family Features) The Midwest and Mid-Atlantic have been plagued with above average snowfall and below average cold temperatures throughout the 2013-2014 winter season. As the meteorological winter’s three coldest months of the year finally come to a close, homeowners may find that the wrath of this winter has left long-term damage in its wake.   In regions hit hard this winter, the seemingly harmless icicles dangling from rooftops may actually signal potential ice dams. An ice dam is a wall of ice along the edge of the roof that forms when melting snow continually thaws over…
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    Brain And Consciousness Research

  • Rapid whole-brain imaging with single cell resolution

    24 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    In collaboration with several Japanese institutes, researchers at the RIKEN Quantitative Biology Center in Japan demonstrate an easy and fast way to achieve whole brain imaging for 3-D analysis of gene expression profiles and neural circuits at the systems level.
  • Synapses -- stability in transformation

    24 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    Synapses remain stable if their components grow in coordination with each other.
  • Our brains are hardwired for language

    24 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    People blog, they don't lbog, and they schmooze, not mshooze. But why is this? Why are human languages so constrained? Can such restrictions unveil the basis of the uniquely human capacity for language?
  • Eavesdropping on brain cell chatter

    23 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    Everything we do -- all of our movements, thoughts and feelings -- are the result of neurons talking with one another, and recent studies have suggested that some of the conversations might not be all that private. Brain cells known as astrocytes may be listening in on, or even participating in, some of those discussions. But a new mouse study suggests that astrocytes might only be tuning in part of the time -- specifically, when the neurons get really excited about something.
  • Why interest is crucial to your success

    23 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    Maintaining an interest in the goals you pursue can improve your work and reduce burnout, according to research from Duke University.
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    ZME Science

  • Legalizing marijuana doesn’t encourage consumption among teens

    Tibi Puiu
    24 Apr 2014 | 10:37 am
    A common concern among the general public, parents especially, is that once a draft calling for legalizing marijuana goes through, this will have as an effect increased consumption among adolescents. A  new study at Rhode Island Hospital which compared 20 years worth of data from states with and without medical marijuana laws found, however, that there was no statistically relevant cause to the claim. As such, legalizing the drug did not lead to increased use among adolescents. The findings could prove to be important in pushing medical marijuana legalization in other states in the U.S.A.
  • Blood from world’s oldest woman tells us why life reaches its limits

    Tibi Puiu
    24 Apr 2014 | 10:14 am
    Hendrikje van Andel-Schipper, aged 115. Photo: wikia.com No matter how much some would like to avoid this prospect, death is inevitable for all living beings (or is it?). Yet, some people at least live longer than others. A great deal of attention has been drawn to longevity for obvious reasons, but any effort to prolong life needs to start with the very root of the problem – death. So, why do people die of old age? What are the underlying processes? Scientists in Netherlands found invaluable clues as to how our bodies steadily succumb to the inevitable, ultimate end after studying…
  • 3D printer used to build 10 homes in one day in China

    Tibi Puiu
    24 Apr 2014 | 8:47 am
    Photo: Winsun New Materials Say what you will, but the Chinese are clearly the fastest builders in the world, though sometimes quick haste makes to waste. A while ago, I wrote about how a Chinese company wants to build the tallest skyscraper in the world in just 90 days. Really crazy stuff, but now another Chinese company, with many years of experience working with 3D printers, plan to revolutionize the way fast constructions are being made. To demonstrate their concept, the Suzhou-based construction materials firm Winsun built 10 homes, albeit modest looking, in only a day using a massive,…
  • Making graphene in a kitchen blender

    Tibi Puiu
    24 Apr 2014 | 7:05 am
    A team led by Jonathan Coleman at Trinity College Dublin reports they’ve patented a technique that can easily produce large quantities of quality graphene. The method is so simple that the researchers have even been able to scale it down for use in a kitchen blender. The exact ‘recipe’ has yet to be disclosed, but nevertheless ZME readers are warranted they should NOT try this at home! The industrial blender Trinity College Dublin researchers used to produce graphene flakes. They claim a regular 400 W kitchen blender can be used too. Photo: CRANN. Graphene is hailed as the…
  • Claws of meanest crustacean inspire supermaterial design

    Tibi Puiu
    24 Apr 2014 | 6:00 am
    The punching mantis shrimp is one of the meanest sea dweller. Photo: Carlos Puma As the night covers the tropics, odd clicky sounds run about much to the annoyance of sailors stationed in harbors. These sounds are made by the punching mantis shrimp, a very small crustacean which doesn’t seem that much threatening but who definitely lives up to its name. Its claws are so powerful that it can clamp with a force up to 1,000 times its own weight, shattering unsuspecting prey, other punching mantises and just about anyone or anything that gets in its way. This is a bad shrimp, no doubt, yet…
 
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    BEYONDbones

  • Spread your wings: Adopt a Butterfly at HMNS on May 10

    Nancy
    24 Apr 2014 | 8:01 am
    The beauty of butterflies is undeniable. Whether you’re gazing at the brilliant hues of a Blue Morpho, taking in the incredible delicacy of Rice Paper butterflies as they flit about, or staring at an Owl Butterfly as its wings stare right back at you, these incredible creatures captivate the viewer. And who looking upon them hasn’t wanted to have their very own butterfly garden? Luckily for you, what’s ours is yours. Everything at HMNS is here for you to make your own, and now, we don’t just want you to own the Cockrell Butterfly Center, but you can actually own a butterfly when you…
  • You saved our ‘scope at the George Observatory! And this is how it happened.

    Peggy
    22 Apr 2014 | 10:01 am
    CliffsNotes: Thanks to all of you, we have done exactly what S.O.S. intended, and we saved our ‘scope! HMNS is proud to own the largest telescope in the country that is open to the public on a regular basis, the Gueymard Research Telescope. Many of you have come and enjoyed the night skies and looked through this amazing telescope at the George Observatory. But it needed some well-deserved TLC this past winter. You saved it! The donations to repair the Gueymard telescope ranged from pennies to $10,000, and came from families, individuals, children, companies and foundations! Special…
  • Attention, jewelry lovers: Glam up with new designers at our Museum Store!

    Jennifer
    19 Apr 2014 | 4:38 pm
    Spring is a great time to refresh your look and we’ve got some new lines in the Museum Store just in time to help!   ax + apple Jamie Lyn of ax + apple dabbled in almost every possible visual art before falling in love with jewelry design. Having worked on a few period films in her stint as a props person, she accumulated an assortment of vintage findings, including an array of world coins, various men’s pocket watch chains, and pen knives. She began artfully combining these and other fine vintage components, with a modern eye and an appreciation for “making things like they…
  • Celebrate Earth Day 2014 with environmental documentary Trashed at its Houston premiere

    Amy P
    17 Apr 2014 | 12:43 pm
    The beauty of Earth from space stands in stark contrast to the view from the ground. There is now more human detritus across the globe than ever before. Industrialization, coupled with exponential population increases, pose a serious threat to the life and health of humans and ecosystems across the world. A scene from the documentary Trashed, making its Houston premiere on Thursday, April 24 at 6:30 p.m. at the Houston Museum of Natural Science in celebration of Earth Day 2014. Vast landscapes in China are covered in tons of rubbish. The wide waters of the Ciliwung River in Indonesia are now…
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    Harvard Gazette

  • Paulus is among Time 100

    24 Apr 2014 | 5:25 am
    Time magazine has named American Repertory Theater (A.R.T.) Artistic Director Diane Paulus to the 2014 Time 100, its list of the 100 most influential people in the world. The annual list, now in its 11th year, recognizes the activism, innovation, and achievement of the world’s most influential individuals. Time has called the list a collection of “people who are using their ideas, their visions, their actions to transform the world and have an effect on a multitude of people.” “I am deeply honored by this recognition, which for me is a tribute to the incredible collaboration I have…
  • Body exhibit

    24 Apr 2014 | 4:00 am
    It’s not your usual exhibit. For one thing, it includes a 78-inch skull, a collection of teeth under glass, a 16th-century anatomy text, and a Civil War–era autopsy kit whose saws, chisels, and knives are remarkably similar to those used today. “Body of Knowledge,” an exhibit about five centuries of anatomy and dissection, has been installed this spring on the Science Center’s second floor. It is partly eccentric (a poster of a kneeling skeleton), partly strange (the head cast of a hanged murderer), and also tech savvy: A digital gallery guide available for mobile devices is keyed…
  • Spielberg on Spielberg

    23 Apr 2014 | 2:24 pm
    What do a man-eating shark and a maniacal truck driver have in common? They both helped launch Steven Spielberg’s career. During an appearance at Harvard on Tuesday, the Oscar-winning director recalled the offbeat stars of his early movies and explained the bedrock influences behind his decades of notable filmmaking. Harvard President Drew Faust introduced the session, which was sponsored by the Mahindra Humanities Center’s Rita E. Hauser Forum for the Arts, welcoming Spielberg as a fellow historian, and “as much an educator as an artist.” Center director Homi Bhabha oversaw the…
  • American Academy of Arts and Sciences elects 204 new members

    23 Apr 2014 | 10:51 am
    The American Academy of Arts and Sciences today announced the election of 204 new members, including 16 from Harvard University. The new members include some of the world’s most accomplished scholars, scientists, writers, artists, and civic, corporate, and philanthropic leaders. One of the nation’s most prestigious honorary societies, the Academy is also a leading center for independent policy research. Members contribute to Academy publications and studies of science and technology policy, energy and global security, social policy and American institutions, and the humanities, arts, and…
  • New frontier of risk

    23 Apr 2014 | 10:46 am
    A recent study by a group of Harvard-affiliated researchers found a sharp increase in the use of opioid painkillers among a large group of pregnant women between 2000 and 2007. The increase means that more than one in five women receiving Medicaid — which pays for 40 percent of U.S. births — took codeine, oxycodone, or another opioid sometime during their pregnancy, a troubling trend particularly because opioids have been implicated in potentially fatal birth defects in fetuses. The research team included scientists and physicians from the Harvard School of Public Health as well as…
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    Chemical Heritage Foundation

  • Distillations April Webcast: Alchemy's Rainbow

    18 Apr 2014 | 12:38 pm
    Our latest webcast explores the colorful (and sometimes risk-filled) history of pigments and painters, and the conservators who save paintings from the ravages of time and accidental chemistry. "Alchemy’s Rainbow: Pigment Science and the Art of Conservation" features art conservator Mark F. Bockrath and art historian and CHF fellow Elisabeth Berry Drago. Our guests discuss and show the messy and occasionally dangerous process of making paints from pigments and the transition to using paints from tubes. They explain how conservators preserve paintings and why alchemists were so important…
  • Tumblr Topic: Alchemy in Art

    16 Apr 2014 | 5:29 am
    Follow the ChemHeritage Alchemy in Art board on Pinterest. Our April 2014 Tumblr Topic explores the colorful history of pigments, painters, and the conservators who save this legacy from the ravages of time and accidental chemistry. Participate in our webcast on April 16 using the hashtag #SciCulture and follow us here for more blog posts on the topic. We’d enjoy hearing your thoughts on this topic. Share the theme using this url: http://chemheritage.tumblr.com/tagged/april2014alchemyart
  • Art and Science: Two Parts of a Whole

    15 Apr 2014 | 7:00 am
    By Michal Meyer Are art and science ying and yang, essential yet opposite parts of our world? We can trace the origins of material science to the first cave drawings made thousands of years ago. The artists who left these pictures likely began with trial and error attempts made with burned wood and colored dirt. Even then art and science were mingling, taking physical form through pigment. Art and science also meet in fascinating ways in the Dutch alchemical paintings that were so popular in the 17th century. Not only did these paintings show alchemists at work, they required the skills of…
  • painting like it's 1699

    11 Apr 2014 | 1:50 pm
    How did 17th-century painters create their masterpieces without Dick Blick, tupperware, or modern conveniences like paint in tubes? To explain the matter Elisabeth Berry Drago, a PhD candidate in Art History at the University of Delaware and a fellow at CHF, takes us on an artistic tour of Philadelphia. This video will screen as a part of our live webcast with Elisabeth Berry Drago and Mark F. Bockrath, a paintings conservator for Barbara A. Buckley and Associates Painting Conservation. View "Alchemy’s Rainbow: Pigment Science and the Art of Conservation" at chemheritage.org/live at…
  • You Got your Alchemy in my Art! You Got your Art in my Alchemy!

    3 Apr 2014 | 8:55 am
    Plate IV in William Salmon’s Polygraphice (Roy G. Neville Historical Chemical Library, CHF) By Elisabeth Berry Drago Art and alchemy, science and painting. They’re kind of a delicious combination. And not as bizarre as it sounds, I promise. For a modern reader, William Salmon’s Polygraphice might seem like a strange jumble, a hodgepodge of unrelated things shoved into one overstuffed Hot Pocket of a book. Published in 1685, the Polygraphice is at first glance an instruction manual for artists on the best ways to grind colors, prepare a canvas, and study the proportions of the human…
 
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    Videos

  • Who's The New Host For DNews?

    DNews
    19 Apr 2014 | 4:00 pm
    Who's The New Host For DNews? Here at DNews, we've been actively searching for a new host. Does Tara Long have what it takes to host a show about science? Find out! Watch More: What's Wit... From: DNews Views: 83001 4698 ratings Time: 04:02 More in Science & Technology
  • A Baffling Balloon Behavior - Smarter Every Day 113

    SmarterEveryDay
    19 Apr 2014 | 6:24 am
    A Baffling Balloon Behavior - Smarter Every Day 113 Tweet: http://bit.ly/BafflingBalloon FB: http://bit.ly/BalloonBaffle Download a free Audio book: http://bit.ly/AudibleSED More info! ⇊ Click below for more links! ⇊ Click to see me... From: SmarterEveryDay Views: 2749942 36590 ratings Time: 04:41 More in Science & Technology
  • Can We Grow Plants on Mars?

    DNews
    18 Apr 2014 | 1:00 pm
    Can We Grow Plants on Mars? Last year, NASA announced that they had found water on Mars. This posed a question to scientists: Could we grow plants in the soil of Mars? Trace explains wh... From: DNews Views: 107273 2500 ratings Time: 03:27 More in Science & Technology
  • Magic Tricks For Your Body

    BuzzFeedVideo
    17 Apr 2014 | 12:11 pm
    Magic Tricks For Your Body Confuse your body with 4 tricks you can do now. Post to Facebook: http://on.fb.me/RsNXeV Like BuzzFeedVideo on Facebook: http://on.fb.me/18yCF0b Post to Twit... From: BuzzFeedVideo Views: 576889 13195 ratings Time: 01:53 More in Entertainment
  • VELOCIRAPTORS

    vlogbrothers
    1 Apr 2014 | 11:27 am
    VELOCIRAPTORS In which John allows his four-year-old son to choose a topic for today's video. And the topic is velociraptors, which turn out to be a surprisingly interesti... From: vlogbrothers Views: 416787 21468 ratings Time: 03:25 More in People & Blogs
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    NOVA | PBS

  • The Cellular Factory

    24 Apr 2014 | 7:00 am
    What exactly is RNA, and how can you help discover its secrets just by playing a game?
  • Virus Wars

    24 Apr 2014 | 7:00 am
    All cellular life, including you, is in an ancient and unending war with viruses.
  • Imagining Alien Life

    24 Apr 2014 | 7:00 am
    What would life on a red dwarf planet look like?
  • The RNA Origin of Life

    24 Apr 2014 | 7:00 am
    Go on a tour of RNA's evolving role through billions of years of evolutionary history.
  • Nature's Time Capsules

    17 Apr 2014 | 7:00 am
    By studying bogs, scientists can uncover thousands of years of Earth's history.
 
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    Sara Bellum Blog

  • Let’s Talk About Khat

    Sara Bellum
    23 Apr 2014 | 7:22 am
    Never heard of khat (pronounced “cot”)? That’s okay—not many people in the United States use it (its use isn’t measured, so we don’t know the exact numbers). But in some parts of the world, chewing leaves from the khat plant is a social activity, much like meeting a friend for coffee in the United States. However, khat is less like caffeine and more like cocaine. Although we don’t yet know if khat is addictive, research shows it can be very harmful to your health, which is why it is illegal in this country. It is considered by the World Health Organization to be a drug of…
  • Reflecting on Experiences as a NIDA Fall Intern

    Carl M. Letamendi, M.B.A., Ph.D. (ABD)
    16 Apr 2014 | 6:41 am
    I am finishing my Ph.D. in May 2014 in a field housed under the umbrella of social sciences, called conflict analysis and resolution. The field provides the foundation and skills necessary to identify areas of conflict and resolve them without the need for taking legal action. The goal is to ensure that there is a win-win outcome for the parties in dispute. I have always been interested in conducting research in the field of health sciences as well and had planned to attend medical school after my Ph.D. program is complete. Last fall, I had a chance to intern with NIDA, where I had a…
  • Video Game Addiction—Is it Real?

    Sara Bellum
    9 Apr 2014 | 5:54 am
    Doodle Jump. Candy Crush. FarmVille. Angry Birds. Cut the Rope. Fruit Ninja. Words With Friends. Nearly everyone with a smartphone or tablet has played one of these video games. It’s easy to get swept up in the bright colors, cutesy characters—and the satisfaction you feel when you finally complete a difficult level. So you keep playing, and playing, and playing. Lots of people say games like these are “addictive.” But, are they, really? Maybe. Addiction Science Award Winner Ethan Guinn definitely thought so. Dopamine: Sweet Rewards for the Brain Rewards in video games, such as…
  • The Connection Between Pain Medications and Heroin

    Sara Bellum
    2 Apr 2014 | 6:32 am
    More and more young people are using heroin these days, and sometimes they start using it because they’ve gotten addicted to prescription painkillers. One study showed that people who abuse painkillers like OxyContin are 19 times more likely to start using heroin. The study also found that 8 out of 10 people who started using heroin abused painkillers first. Heroin and painkillers belong to the same class of drugs: Opioids. Opioids attach to specific molecules called opioid receptors, which are found on nerve cells in the brain, spinal cord, intestines, and other organs. When painkillers or…
  • Legal Marijuana and Driving: A Public Safety Problem

    Sara Bellum
    26 Mar 2014 | 7:59 am
    When you’re driving down the highway at 60 miles per hour, you need a clear head. Driving while distracted by your phone or driving under the influence of alcohol both can lead to crashes and tragedy. Driving under the influence of marijuana is also dangerous, because of the way the drug affects the brain and body. Recent news reports have talked about how drugged driving crashes and deaths have surged since medical marijuana has become legal in more states. Now that marijuana is legal for those over age 21 in Colorado and Washington, the rates of drugged driving are likely to increase even…
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    Mr Science Show

  • arXiv trawl: March 2014 - Astrobiology

    30 Mar 2014 | 2:49 am
    This month's arXiv trawl brings us to astrobiology.The Habitable Epoch of the Early UniverseIn recent weeks, the world of cosmology has been buzzing with the news that gravitational waves - remnants of the Big Bang - may have been detected by the BICEP2 experiment. But did life come not long afterwards?Abraham Loeb from Harvard University has posited in his paper The Habitable Epoch of the Early Universe that conditions were rife for life just 10 million years after the Big Bang. Life on Earth is about 3.5 billions years old, and it took about 1 billion years to first appear after the Earth…
  • Copper Nanotubes

    17 Mar 2014 | 8:57 pm
    It's not often a chemistry journal article will make you laugh out loud. From Structural and electronic properties of chiral single-wall copper nanotubes - enjoy.Abstract:The structural, energetic and electronic properties of chiral (n, m) (3⩽n⩽6, n/2⩽m⩽n) single-wall copper nanotubes (CuNTs) have been investigated by using projector-augmented wave method based on density-functional theory. The (4, 3) CuNT is energetically stable and should be observed experimentally in both free-standing and tip-suspended conditions, whereas the (5, 5) and (6, 4) CuNTs should be observed in…
  • Cricket is a matter of life and death

    17 Mar 2014 | 8:44 pm
    A guest post by Bernard KachoyanEver thought of batting as a life and death struggle against hostile forces? It always seemed that way when I batted. Well you might be more accurate than you think. The experience of a batsman can be described as a microcosm of life: when you go out to bat you are “born”, when you get out you “die”. But what happens when you are Not Out (NO)? More subtly, when you are Not Out you simply leave the sample pool, that is you live for a while then you stop being measured. In the parlance of statistics, this becomes “censored” data. In medical research…
  • What to do with old swimming caps

    14 Mar 2014 | 4:58 am
    Since the start of the 2013/2014 ocean swimming season, around 20,000 swimming caps have been handed out to competitors at the various ocean swims in NSW. If you are a regular ocean swimmer, it doesn’t take too long before you have more caps than you know what to do with. Some may be used again in the pool, and some given to friends and family, but the vast majority of these caps will end up in land-fill having spent most of the season at the bottom of your swimming bag.This year at the 2014 Coogee Island Challenge, we are running a swimming cap “amnesty”. Bring down your old caps that…
  • Ep 153: Complex Network Analysis in Cricket

    11 Mar 2014 | 4:06 am
    Complex network analysis is an area of network science and part of graph theory that can be used to rank things, one of the most famous examples of which is the Google PageRank algorithm. But it can also be applied to sport. Cricket is a sport in which it is difficult to rank teams (there are three forms of the game, the various countries do not play each other very often etc.), whilst it is notoriously difficult to rank individual players (for how the ICC do it, see Ep 107: Ranking Cricketers).Satyam Mukherjee at Northwestern University became a bit famous when The economist picked up his…
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    EurekAlert! - Breaking News

  • New type of protein action found to regulate development

    23 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Johns Hopkins researchers report they have figured out how the aptly named protein Botch blocks the signaling protein called Notch, which helps regulate development. In a report on the discovery, to appear online April 24 in the journal Cell Reports, the scientists say they expect the work to lead to a better understanding of how a single protein, Notch, directs actions needed for the healthy development of organs as diverse as brains and kidneys.
  • Some corals adjusting to rising ocean temperatures, Stanford researchers say

    23 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Research led by Stanford scientist Steve Palumbi reveals how some corals can quickly switch on or off certain genes in order to survive in warmer-than-average tidal waters.
  • The Ancient Maya and virtual worlds: Different perspectives on material meanings

    23 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    A UC researcher explores the Maya perspective on the material world and begins to uncover parallels with today's online culture.
  • International collaboration unravels novel mechanism for neurological disorder

    23 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    A team of international scientists led by Baylor College of Medicine has discovered a novel gene (CLP1) associated with a neurological disorder affecting both the peripheral and central nervous systems. Together with scientists in Vienna they show that disturbance of a very basic biological process, tRNA biogenesis, can result in cell death of neural progenitor cells. This leads to abnormal brain development and a small head circumference as well as dysfunction of peripheral nerves.
  • Genome yields insights into golden eagle vision, smell

    23 Apr 2014 | 9:00 pm
    Purdue and West Virginia University researchers are the first to sequence the genome of the golden eagle, providing a bird's-eye view of eagle features that could lead to more effective conservation strategies.
 
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    The Daily Galaxy --Great Discoveries Channel: Sci, Space, Tech

  • "Farside of the World" --South Pole's Role in the Epic Discovery of Gravitational Waves

    dailygalaxy.com
    24 Apr 2014 | 8:37 am
    "The South Pole is the closest you can get to space and still be on the ground," says John Kovac of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics, leader of the BICEP2 collaboration. "It's one of the driest and clearest locations on Earth, perfect for observing the faint microwaves from the Big Bang." Almost 14 billion years ago, the universe we inhabit burst into existence in an extraordinary event that initiated the Big Bang. In the first fleeting fraction of a second, the universe expanded exponentially, stretching far beyond the view of our best telescopes. All this, of course, was just…
  • Fossil Signal from the Earliest Moments of the Universe Reveals New Unknowns --Does It Point to a New Physics?

    dailygalaxy.com
    24 Apr 2014 | 6:18 am
    "There have been hints for a while now that maybe something else is going on," says Stanford's Kavli Foundation Deputy Director John Carlstrom, who leads two other experiments that study the universe's first light. "Maybe we need to… allow some new physics in there. Maybe there are more neutrinos. Maybe they're more massive than we thought. Or maybe it's something none of us have thought of yet." Last month, scientists announced the first hard evidence for cosmic inflation, the process by which the infant universe swelled from microscopic to cosmic size in an instant. This almost…
  • Thanks for Your Patience! We're Back Online...

    dailygalaxy.com
    24 Apr 2014 | 6:17 am
    Typepad, our longtime publishing platform, suffered a Denial of Service attack for six straight days. All's back to normal now. Our thanks for your understanding and loyalty! The Daily Galaxy team.
  • "Spacetime is an Emerging Phenomenon" --Does It Violate Einstein's Special Relativity?

    dailygalaxy.com
    23 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    What if spacetime were a kind of fluid? This is the question tackled by theoretical physicists working on quantum gravity by creating models attempting to reconcile gravity and quantum mechanics. Some of these models predict that spacetime at the Planck scale (10-33cm) is no longer continuous – as held by classical physics – but discrete in nature. Just like the solids or fluids we come into contact with every day, which can be seen as made up of atoms and molecules when observed at sufficient resolution. A structure of this kind generally implies, at very high energies, violations of…
  • NASA's Scientists' Insights on Kepler-Mision Discovery of 1st Earth-Sized Planet in Habitable Zone

    dailygalaxy.com
    23 Apr 2014 | 4:00 am
    “Whether we are an extremely rare fluke — a phenomenon that only happens once in a universe — or in a galaxy teeming with life is a very basic question not only of science, but of our existence,” said Dimitar Sasselov, a planetary astrophysicist at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics who was not involved in the discovery. It’s “the first time in human history we have a good shot at answering that question, and that’s very exciting.” “This is really a tip-of-the-iceberg discovery,” said study co-author Jason Rowe, an astronomer at the SETI Institute in Mountain…
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    Science and Enterprise

  • Electro-Gene Therapy with Cochlear Implant Boosts Hearing

    Alan
    24 Apr 2014 | 9:41 am
    Inside of the cochlea after DNA delivery. The green spots show the location of cells that are expressing the therapeutic gene, which is close to where the cochlear implant electrodes were positioned. (J. Pinyon and G. Housley, UNSW) 24 April 2014. Researchers at University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia delivered genetic material with electric impulses into cochlear implants that improves the quality of hearing to nearly normal in deaf lab animals. The team led by UNSW’s Gary Housley published its findings in today’s issue of the journal Science Translational Medicine…
  • Touch Screen Data Visualization App Developed for iPad

    Alan
    23 Apr 2014 | 1:30 pm
    (Sean MacEntee/Flickr) 23 April 2014. Computer scientists at Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh designed an app for the Apple iPad that allows data stored in worksheets to be manipulated on a touch screen with fingers. Ph.D. candidate Jeffrey Rzeszotarski and computer science professor Niki Kittur will discuss their app, called Kinetica, at next week’s ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems in Toronto Kinetica harnesses the iPad’s touch screen to visually sort, order, filter, and categorize cases from data sets to find underlying patterns and trends. With…
  • FDA Proposes Accelerated Medical Device Approval Process

    Alan
    23 Apr 2014 | 7:53 am
    Medical device testing lab (FDA.gov) 23 April 2014. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration proposed yesterday a change in its approval processes for devices that meet unfilled treatment or diagnostic needs of patients with serious medical conditions. The Expedited Access Pre-market Approval Application, says the agency, is designed to speed not only the approval of new medical devices, but also their product development. FDA also proposed new guidance for its collection of data after initial approval of medical devices to balance reporting requirements with the premarket approval process. The…
  • Most Americans Favor Contraceptives Required in Health Plans

    Alan
    22 Apr 2014 | 2:25 pm
    (WomensHealth.gov) 22 April 2014. A nationwide survey shows about 7 in 10 Americans support birth control medications being required in health insurance plans. The survey, conducted in November 2013 by a team at University of Michigan at Ann Arbor is reported today online in the Journal of the American Medical Association. The Affordable Care Act includes a provision requiring employers to include coverage for contraceptives as part of their basic health care plans for employees. In March, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments in a case where a company claimed covering some birth…
  • Gecko-Inspired Adhesive Sticks to Wide Range of Materials

    Alan
    18 Apr 2014 | 1:52 pm
    Gecko foot (Bjørn Christian Tørrissen/Wikimedia Commons) 18 April 2014. Materials scientists and biologists at University of Massachusetts in Amherst developed an adhesive technology that attaches heavy loads to a variety of surfaces, yet can still be easily removed and reused. The journal Advanced Materials published yesterday online the work of the team led by polymer scientist Alfred Crosby (paid subscription required). To create the technology, the UMass team emulated the adhesive properties of feet found on the Tokay gecko, a reptile found in Southeast Asia and Australia. The…
 
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    Lake Scientist | Lake Scientist

  • Research Summary: Tracking Water Chestnut and Other Invasive Species in Pennsylvania Lakes and Waterways Using iMapInvasives

    Daniel Kelly
    23 Apr 2014 | 6:56 am
    Invasive species in Pennsylvania’s lakes and associated waterways can be a threat to developed and natural systems, reduce water quality, degrade recreational experiences, and cause loss of biodiversity. Water chestnut (Trapa natans), for example is an aquatic plant with the ability to completely smother a lake surface, impeding recreational activities, limiting light and oxygen to native plants, and providing little nutritional value to local animal inhabitants. Water chestnut has been a severe problem for many years in Lake Towhee, a 50-acre lake located in northern Bucks County,…
  • Sweden’s Lake Vanern is Largest in European Union

    Daniel Kelly
    22 Apr 2014 | 9:56 am
    Sweden’s coastal islands, sweeping hills and tiny towns enhance its extensive natural beauty. Much of the country’s idyllic landscape was shaped by retreating ice at the end of the last ice age, leaving behind meltwater that dotted the country with lakes. Sweden has more than 97,000 lakes, including its largest lake and the biggest of the European Union: Lake Vänern. Sitting at 2,183 square miles, it is the third largest lake in all of Europe, behind Russian Lakes Ladoga and Onega. Lake Vanern, August 2012. (Credit: Wikimedia Commons User Oyvind Holmstad) Lake Vänern supports several…
  • Waterfowl Study Begins on Poyang Lake

    Daniel Kelly
    21 Apr 2014 | 11:36 am
    Researchers at Virginia Tech University are joining forces with scientists in China to study waterfowl around Poyang Lake, the country’s largest freshwater lake. Poyang supports hundreds of thousands of migratory waterfowl each year. Collaborators from Nanchang University and the International Crane Foundation are also helping in the study, looking largely at the lake’s ecology. They are studying the lake’s fisheries and mussels. Poyang Lake. (Credit: Flickr User Gotterdammerung via Creative Commons) In the project’s beginnings, members of the Virginia Tech Shorebird Program have…
  • Friday Five: Glacial Lakes Around the World

    Daniel Kelly
    18 Apr 2014 | 9:42 am
    Many lakes worldwide have been formed by glaciation, or the movement and subsequent melting of glaciers. This process occurred commonly near the end of the last ice age, about 10,000 years ago. Eroding the land beneath, retreating glaciers left behind irregular shorelines and unique shapes for meltwater to fill, forming many of the world’s beautiful lakes. Lake Bled Slovenia’s Lake Bled is surrounded by the Julian Alps, a mountain range named after Julius Caesar. It is a fairly shallow lake, only reaching 100 feet in depth. Lake Bled’s waters remain relatively calm due to the…
  • Study: Fish in Pristine Lakes Contain Mercury

    Daniel Kelly
    17 Apr 2014 | 6:50 am
    Fish in even the most pristine and secluded lakes contain mercury, according to a recent study completed by the National Park Service and U.S. Geological Survey that examined lakes and streams in 21 U.S. national parks. More than 1,400 fish were collected from 2008 to 2012 in high-elevation lakes and streams in Alaska and the western United States, areas that are largely removed from human impacts. Scientists looking at mercury levels detected them in every single fish. Alaska’s Lake Clark. (Credit: Ryjil Christianson via Wikimedia Commons) The concentrations found varied widely between…
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    Frontier Scientists

  • What I learned this Earth Day, 2014

    Laura
    22 Apr 2014 | 5:39 pm
    Laura Nielsen for Frontier Scientists – In the summer I drive to my favorite of many nearby glacial lakes, a deep down-turned gumdrop of cool water ringed in lillypads. I catch painted box turtles. After a frenetic chase and what feels like too long without air I surface gasping, and marveling at each turtle’s personality. […]
  • Predicting the effect of anomalous sea ice loss and increasing sea surface temperatures on global storm systems

    Azara Mohammadi
    15 Apr 2014 | 2:46 pm
    Azara Mohammadi – To become a PhD candidate at the University of Alaska Fairbanks, Soumik Basu moved from his home in Kolkata, India to a region infamous for its “below zero” weather: Interior Alaska. Basu left warm weather and his family (not to mention his mother’s cooking) because “The climate is changing, so I wanted […]
  • The ground changing under our feet – Thermokarsts

    Laura
    8 Apr 2014 | 12:59 pm
    Laura Nielsen for Frontier Scientists – Jason Dobkowski stands on the shores of Wolverine Lake. His research site is located in the North Slope of Alaska, nestled near the remote foothills of the Brooks Range. “I’m here studying permafrost thaw slump which is depositing silt and material into the lake behind me. And that material, […]
  • Snowy Owl Irruption

    Laura
    1 Apr 2014 | 10:30 am
    Laura Nielsen for Frontier Scientists – This winter snowy owls were on the move; unusually large numbers of the magnificent birds made their way to the Lower 48 United States. With a wing span greater than four feet and distinctive plumage, snowy owls are a glorious sight. The birds’ winter migrations normally take them to […]
  • Tram Powered International Tundra Experiment

    Laura
    25 Mar 2014 | 11:00 am
    Liz O’Connell for Frontier Scientists – Multiple instruments, configured along a tram-like platform, sense the tundra below and gather detailed data while traveling along a 50 meter transect.  “We are gathering measurements that we don’t know exactly how they will be used,” said Steven Oberbauer, professor of biological sciences at Florida International University. The high […]
 
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    Midwest Labs Blog | Omaha

  • Cover Crops – Soil

    Pohlman Brent
    24 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    Check out this video after one year of cover crops, cereal rye. The difference, visually is really noticeable. The soils with cover crops and without cover crops look completely different. It would be interesting to take this scenario a step farther and test the soil. photo credit: USDA NRCS South Dakota via photopin cc
  • Soil Health – Cover Crops

    Pohlman Brent
    23 Apr 2014 | 4:39 am
    Check out this story of how one Iowa Farmer is using cover crops and no-till practices to improve the overall quality and stewardship of their soil. Soil Health is getting more air-time in 2014. It is all about understanding the makeup of your soil and finding ways to maximize the nutritional benefits in the soil. […]
  • Cellulosic Ethanol Technology

    Pohlman Brent
    22 Apr 2014 | 4:37 am
    Check out this video and learn a little more about the process of producing ethanol from cellulosic materials. It is important to understand the process and see how ethanol is produced in this process. Over the next few days, you will hear a report that suggests that the cellulosic process produces more green house gasses […]
  • Dealing With Winter Yard Kill

    Pohlman Brent
    21 Apr 2014 | 5:06 am
    Have you started to get your yard ready by doing the following: Started watering your lawn Put down your first pre-emergent application Starting to kill your first, few dandelions Are you starting to see spots like those in the picture above where no grass is coming up at all. It may be due to winter […]
  • FedEx Shipping at Your Desk

    Pohlman Brent
    18 Apr 2014 | 6:12 am
    Are you aware that Midwest Laboratories Clients can now print shipping labels to ship samples from the convenience of their computer? This program has only been active for a few months, but word is getting out more and more. Once you log-in with your account on the Midwest Laboratories Home Page. Under Shipping Options, look […]
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    EcoTone: news and views on ecological science

  • Celebrating Earth Day in 2014

    katie@esa.org (Katie Kline)
    22 Apr 2014 | 12:26 pm
    Me and milkweed fruit - my #NatureSelfie for #EarthDay. Nash Turley, a naturalist, photographer, musician, and PhD student in evolutionary ecology at the University of Toronto, snapped this shot in Ithaca, NY, in 2011. He tweeted, "Everyday is Earth Day; the fact that the calendar says today is 'Earth Day' doesn't really mean anything to me. Sort of like how aboriginal cultures don't have a word for 'nature' because they didn't see themselves as separate from nature….the fact that we have a day for the Earth shows how disconnected modern societies are from 'nature'." Earth Day started as a…
  • ESA Policy News April 21: climate future, Forest Legacy, ESA visits the Hill

    katie@esa.org (Katie Kline)
    21 Apr 2014 | 8:36 am
    Here are some highlights from the latest ESA Policy New […]
  • ESA’s 2nd annual Science Cafe Prize — take your science out of the box

    katie@esa.org (Katie Kline)
    15 Apr 2014 | 3:44 pm
    Have a science story you want to tell? Send in your pitch for our public pub talk at the Ecological Society's 99th Annual Meeting this summer. Contest deadline: Friday, 30 May 2014.
  • Sage grouse struts his stuff

    katie@esa.org (Katie Kline)
    7 Apr 2014 | 3:19 pm
    Like gyms or bars, lekking grounds are social performance spaces, where males spread their tail-feathers, inflate their impressive chests, and strut about, calling amorously to the lady birds. Ecologist Gail Patricelli of UC Davis captured this video of a lek near Hudson, Wyoming. US Fish and Wildlife Service named the grouse’s habitat, the Great Plains sage-steppe, one of the most imperiled ecosystems in America.
  • Sage grouse losing habitat to fire as endangered species decision looms

    katie@esa.org (Katie Kline)
    3 Apr 2014 | 2:50 pm
    Wildfire is the predominant cause of habitat loss in the Great Basin. Reseeding burned land to stabilize soils has not restored sagebrush habitat for the endangered greater sage grouse, according to a report in the journal Ecosphere. The US Fish and Wildlife Service is considering protecting the grouse under the Endangered Species act, which could affect the management of 250,000 square miles of land in the western US.
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    Science + Technology – Articles – The Conversation

  • Underwater volcano creates huge floating islands of rock, disrupts shipping

    Simon Redfern, Professor in Earth Sciences at University of Cambridge
    24 Apr 2014 | 1:15 am
    Floating pumice. Jeff Butterworth A team of scientists from the UK, the US, Australia and New Zealand have modelled the fate of a huge floating raft of volcanic rocks that formed in 2012 during a submarine eruption of a Pacific volcano. Described in this month’s edition of Nature Communications, they show how satellite images of the floating-rock raft’s passage across the Pacific can be used to test models of ocean circulation. Their results could be used to forecast the dispersal of future pumice (volcanic rock) islands, and protect shipping from the hazards they pose. The eruptions of…
  • A new approach to cut death toll of young people in road accidents

    Bridie Scott-Parker, Research Fellow at University of the Sunshine Coast
    23 Apr 2014 | 1:05 pm
    Too often in Australia we hear tragic stories of another young life cut short in a car accident and yet any attempts to dramatically reduce the death toll are not working. Young male drivers are our hardest hit, with male drivers aged 17 to 24 making up just 12.7% of all licence holders in Queensland but accounting for 20.3% of driver fatalities. Across Australia around 45% of all deaths of young people can be atrributed to a road accident with a 17-year-old P-plate driver four times more likely be involved in a fatal road accident than a 26 year old driver. There has been some reduction in…
  • On global warming, settled science and George Brandis

    Matthew Bailes, Pro-Vice Chancellor (Research) at Swinburne University of Technology
    22 Apr 2014 | 9:54 pm
    Attorney-General George Brandis during a debate at Parliament House in Canberra. AAP Image/Daniel Munoz The Australian Attorney General, Senator George Brandis is no stranger to controversy. His statement in parliament that “people do have a right to be bigots” rapidly gained him notoriety, and it isn’t hard to understand why. Lately he’s in the news again, this time concerning climate change. The Guardian recently ran a news story with the headline “George Brandis: sidelining climate change deniers is ‘deplorable’”. It went on saying the Attorney general accuses ‘true…
  • VIDEO: Solving the world's toilet shortage

    Dani Barrington, Research Fellow in Water, Sanitation and Hygiene at Monash University
    22 Apr 2014 | 6:10 pm
    In this episode of TCTV, water sanitation and hygiene engineer Dani Barrington explains the importance of toilets and community-led approaches to sanitation for one-third of the world’s population who lack access to adequate sanitation. This video is a co-production between SBS World News and The Conversation. See also:Solving the toilet shortage needs a bottom-up approachVIDEO: Were the first artists women? Dani Barrington is employed by Monash University as a Research Fellow. Her current work is funded as part of the DFAT Australian Development Research Awards Scheme. She is also…
  • The rewards and punishments of being two

    Olivia Carter, Senior Research Fellow and Lecturer at University of Melbourne
    22 Apr 2014 | 4:53 pm
    Imagine if you woke up one day and found yourself unexpectedly surrounded by presents and then a few days later you woke up to find chocolate eggs all over your room. Would you rejoice in your good fortune or question whether you are hallucinating? Last week my little Max celebrated his second birthday and a few days later enjoyed his first visit from the Easter Bunny. This week of unforeseen bounty, must have been all the more surprising given our recent need to hand out some of his first genuine punishments. I can’t imagine how his little brain is trying to make sense of it all. Now two,…
 
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    Sciencebase Science Blog

  • What is Protomyxzoa Rheumatica?

    David Bradley
    16 Apr 2014 | 12:14 am
    A contact on Twitter mentioned an apparently newly discovered parasitic disease which goes by the name of Protomyxzoa Rheumatica or the “Fry bug”, named for its apparent discoverer Fry Laboratories of Scottsdale, Arizona. The discoverers have published no scientific papers about this organism as far as I can tell. Although protomyxzoa.org (registered in September 2012) says Fry has a PCR test for the pathogen and the person running the site says they were diagnosed by the labs in February of that year. No reference to Protomyxzoa Rheumatica comes up with a search of the Fry…
  • Planetary cakes

    David Bradley
    1 Apr 2014 | 12:17 am
    Who wouldn’t want a spongy Jupiter or a vanilla Earth with tectonic icing? I do wish they’d not misspelled concentric, but never mind. Can I have a slice of Jupiter with the spot? Planetary cakes is a post from the science blog of David Bradley, author of Deceived Wisdom Subscribe to our Email Newsletter
  • First World Problems

    David Bradley
    26 Mar 2014 | 6:53 am
    First-world Problems…you know the kind of thing…and the biggest most self-referential of them is worrying that that the phrase is itself not politically correct! There ain’t no problem that’s too small For us to gripe and moan and bawl There ain’t a thing we can’t complain We even groan when it don’t rain Sunshine’s warm but that’s not all We have the food, we live the life But little things they give us strife The time we have we often waste We move too fast, less speed more haste The angst it cuts you like a knife First world problems…
  • 10 cancer myths busted

    David Bradley
    24 Mar 2014 | 6:55 am
    Cancer Research UK has an interesting post busting ten of the most irritating and persistent pieces of deceived wisdom about cancer: Myth 1: Cancer is a man-made, modern disease Myth 2: Superfoods prevent cancer Myth 3: ‘Acidic’ diets cause cancer Myth 4: Cancer has a sweet tooth Myth 5: Cancer is a fungus – and sodium bicarbonate is the cure Myth 6: There’s a miracle cancer cure… Myth 7: …And Big Pharma is suppressing it Myth 8: Cancer treatment kills more than it cures Myth 9: We’ve made no progress in fighting cancer Myth 10: Sharks don’t get cancer Don’t believe…
  • Sciencebase first tweets

    David Bradley
    21 Mar 2014 | 2:45 am
    I’ve been on Twitter since June 2007, I wasn’t particularly active early on, as you can see from the frequency of tweets in my archive. But for those of you worried that I changed over the years, here’s a screengrab from my archive showing the first clutch of tweets and their relevance then to what I still post about now – Songs, Snaps, Science. Not that, as far as I know, anyone cares…but you were warned early on. ;-) Incidentally, there is a quick way to reveal your very first tweet here. You could put my twitter handle in there if you really want to see my…
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    QUEST

  • Ho-Chunk Nation Promotes Native Edible Plants

    Maureen McCollum
    24 Apr 2014 | 7:00 am
    While Bill Greendeer embraces the return of indigenous plants on his land, he also welcomes the native species. Photo credit: Maureen McCollum/WPR Ancestors of the Ho-Chunk Nation survived off the land in western Wisconsin for thousands of years. With modern farming techniques and high-tech distractions, however, some tribal members are losing their connection to the native plants. Efforts are now underway to reintroduce indigenous plants to everyone. Ho-Chunk member Bill Greendeer spoke to me as he made his way through a patch of cattails on his land. Soon the tops of the plants will be…
  • Repairing the Land After Frac Sand is Removed

    Rich Kremer
    23 Apr 2014 | 7:00 am
    Sand particles being mined for use during hydraulic fracking. Photo credit: Aden (CC-BY-NC-ND) Just beneath the green, rolling hills of western Wisconsin lies a key ingredient feeding the energy boom across America: sand. The durable sand that’s perfect for hydraulic fracturing is being mined faster than ever before, causing concern about what the land will look like after the rush ends. Now, researchers in a small western Wisconsin county are looking for the best ways to repair the land before the companies leave. At wells across the country, Wisconsin sand is mixed with water and…
  • Reawakening Extinct Species

    Gabriela Quirós
    22 Apr 2014 | 12:01 am
      Ever since the 1993 blockbuster Jurassic Park, the possibility of bringing extinct species back to life has been part of our collective imagination. The film, based on a Michael Crichton novel, was itself inspired by actual scientific breakthroughs in the early 1990s that allowed scientists to use DNA from museum specimens and fossils to recreate the genome — or genetic blueprint — of dead animals. When the film debuted the science wasn’t advanced enough to bring back extinct species. But today it might well be, and researchers’ growing efforts to recreate extinct…
  • Do Water Pollution Tests Lead to "Dead Zones"?

    Robert McClure
    17 Apr 2014 | 7:00 am
    Photo Credit: Brenda Culler, ODNR Coastal Management Reported by Robert McClure, InvestigateWest Waterways across the country are beset by a disturbing pattern: Polluted water discharged from sewage treatment plants carries with it vast amounts of phosphorus and nitrogen, which are known as “nutrients.” The nutrients feed massive algae blooms. Those in turn spur the growth of microbes — teeny-tiny bugs — that suck out of the water the oxygen that’s needed by fish and other aquatic creatures. The result is aquatic “dead zones” like the one off the coast of Louisiana,…
  • Picturing the Invisible: A Conversation with Artist Chris Jordan

    Lisa Landers
    16 Apr 2014 | 7:00 am
    Facts and figures may help us quantify our collective footprint on the world, but they don’t necessarily make us care about it. Spurred by this sense of detachment, photographic artist Chris Jordan struck out on an impassioned quest to imbue some of these cold, hard numbers with deeper meaning. If I allow myself to feel something for the subject that I’m working with, somehow that feeling is embedded in the image itself. Through photographs that are eye opening or heartbreaking — or both, Jordan depicts the collective impacts of human activities on our society and environment. In…
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    As Many Exceptions As Rules

  • Chili Peppers Run Hot And Cold

    23 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    Biology concepts – obesity, brown adipose tissue, agonist/antagonist, protective hypothermia, hyperthermia, reactive oxygen species, ischemia, hypoxiaWhen The Wizard of Oz was released in 1939, it just barely turned a profit. The '39 version was the third attempt at filming the children’s classic, and the first two efforts had not fared much better. I don’t see how people didn’t take to the Wizard of Oz right away. It had new technology for the movies, a good villain, and all those little people. The tin man on the left was played by Jack Haley, but originally it was supposed to Buddy…
  • Using Pain To Stop Pain

    16 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    Biology concepts – desensitization, habituation, counter irritation, cautery, heat sensing, pain, chronic, acute, analgesia Gout usually attacks middle-aged men and the big toe joint is a favorite spot. But it can occur anywhere and in anyone. The accretions or urates build up and clog the joint, causng poor function and intense pain, painful enough that even the weight of a sheet on it at night is too much. Usually the acute attacks are far worse, and become less painful gouty arthritisas they become chronic.Sometimes people use pain to combat pain, as silly as it may sound. Gout is an…
  • Capsaicin – Adding To Or Taking Your Pain

    9 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    Biology concepts – hyperalgesia, allodynia, analgesia, sensitization, potentiation, desensitization, habituation, burning mouth syndrome Apparently this is how people shovel snow in the cold climates. I agree with the form; always bend with your knees not your back. But the bikini? Really? I feel like kind of a wimp for talking about my fingers hurting when I stay out too long.You know that intense pain you get in your fingers when you've been out in the cold for a while? Why does that happen, and why does it get worse when your hands start to warm up or when you run them under lukewarm or…
  • It’s Not Just Chili Peppers That Are Hot

    2 Apr 2014 | 5:00 am
    Biology concepts – cinnamaldehyde, nasal hyperreactivity, piperine, allyl isothiocyanate, eugenol, gingerol, tinyatoxin, osmotic stress, agonist/antagonistThe last few years have seen the rise and fall of The Cinnamon Challenge. I can’t tell you why it came, but I can explain why it went. And the reason relates to the capsaicin receptors we have been talking about. Don’t think cinnamon candy can be hot. Your unbearably hot cinnamon bears from Jelly Belly and your Atomic Fireballs are both flavored with cinnamon oil. Fireballs have been around since the 1950’s which explains the atomic…
  • Naked Mole Rats Don’t Feel The Burn

    26 Mar 2014 | 5:00 am
    Biology concepts – thermoregulation, heat sensing, TRPV1, evolution, neurotransmitters, birds, ectothermy, diet-induced thermogenesis BBC television has a very nice Sherlock Holmes show running nowadays, but it has ticked off some mental health professionals. Sherlock describes himself as a high functioning sociopath. I have read several angry letters from those in the profession saying that he should stop doing so, he is using a mental disorder as an excuse for just plain rude behavior.Diseases of the mind are often more bizarre and more tragic than diseases of the body. Medicine and…
 
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    Laboratory News » News

  • Google Glass could aid Parkinson’s patients

    LaboratoryNews
    24 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    Next generation wearable technology like Google Glass could be used as an assistive aid for those with the neurological condition Parkinson’s disease say researchers from Newcastle University’s Digital Interaction Group. Parkinson’s manifests itself in motor symptoms including rigidity, tremor, bradykinesisa, and freezing due to motor blocks. The technology – likened to a wearable smartphone – could be used as an external cue to remind when to take medication, swallow to stop drooling, or help with overcoming freezes. “Glass opens up a new space for exploring the design and…
  • New Young Scientist Award announced

    LaboratoryNews
    23 Apr 2014 | 3:21 am
    The European Federation of Clinical Chemistry & Laboratory Medicine (EFLM) has announced the New Young Scientist Award which recognises a significant contribution to improving the preanalytical phase. The Walter Guder Preanalytical Award, sponsored by BD (Becton, Dickinson and Company), is looking for the best preanalytical original paper published between 1st January 2013 and 30th April 2014. The winner will receive €5,000, plus costs for attending the scientific conference where the award will be made. The biannual award is given to a young scientist (under the age of 40) who has made…
  • Celebrating Great British Science; we want your ideas!

    LaboratoryNews
    23 Apr 2014 | 12:05 am
    What do you think is the greatest scientific breakthrough made on British shores? Is it Watson and Crick’s discovery of the structure of DNA, or Dame Jocelyn Bell Burnell’s discovery of the first pulsar? Or maybe it was Alan Turing’s development of the Turning Machine? We want your suggestions – and we’d love to know why you chose that particular breakthrough. Perhaps it inspired your career path, or maybe it’s something close to your heart – whatever it is let us know! The best entries will be featured in our Celebrating Great British Science wall chart and in Laboratory…
  • Greater London population at risk of future heat waves

    LaboratoryNews
    23 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    Properly adapting buildings for climate change could significantly reduce the risk of heat-related deaths say researchers who have modelled the effects of future heat waves on the Greater London population in 2050. The University of Oxford model – which takes into account of future changes to urban land use and man-made heat emissions – estimates an additional 800 heat-related deaths per year by 2050. Published in the journal Climatic Change, the research suggests policy makers should focus efforts on adapting buildings and cities for future climate change. The study used projections of…
  • Antimicrobial lassos offer insight into bacterial warfare

    LaboratoryNews
    22 Apr 2014 | 12:00 am
    Starved bacteria use antimicrobial lasso peptides to kill other bacteria by hijacking their nutrient receptors say scientists who have gained the first structural insights into the warfare between bacteria. To uncover these bacterial war tactics, structural data collected from the crystallography beamlines at Diamond Light Source in Oxfordshire was combined with modelling and biochemical experiments. Scientists discovered that bacteria use their lasso peptides – which have a unique knotted structure – to hijack receptors on the outer membranes of cells of other bacteria that cause human…
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    Science and Technology Advancement from Around the World

  • PC to Phone VoIP over Dial-Up

    24 Apr 2014 | 2:05 am
    So you've heard that you can use your computer to make cheap long-distance calls over the Internet. Maybe you've even tried it. Chances are though that if you've attempted VoIP calls over a dial-up connection, you've experienced intermittent quality, 'call drop-outs' and annoying speech transmission delays. The good news is that there are some quick, easy steps that you can take to dramatically
  • Network Security 101

    24 Apr 2014 | 1:55 am
    As more people are logging onto the Internet everyday, Network Security becomes a larger issue. In the United States, identity theft and computer fraud are among the fastest rising crimes. It is important to protect your network and ensure the safety of all computers and users in that network. What is a Network? In order to fully understand network security, one must first understand what exactly
  • More Free Tools Increase Security For Your PC

    24 Apr 2014 | 1:49 am
    A recent article about preventing hackers from breaking into your computer caused an overwhelming response by readers. It seems everyone has an opinion about the best software and advice for keeping your computer safe from viruses and online predators. The following will help you increase your online security and usually without spending a dime! Zone Alarm Zone Alarm offers several versions of
  • Malware: Computing's Dirty Dozen

    24 Apr 2014 | 1:23 am
    It seems that no sooner do you feel safe turning on your computer than you hear on the news about a new kind of internet security threat. Usually, the security threat is some kind of malware (though the term "security threat" no doubt sells more newspapers). What is malware? Malware is exactly what its name implies: mal (meaning bad, in the sense of malignant or malicious rather than just poorly
  • Malware And Antivirus Software

    24 Apr 2014 | 1:18 am
    Warning: most antivirus programs will not protect you against all forms of malignant software (often called "malware") on their own. Find out how to protect yourself. Sure, your antivirus software will protect you against viruses. It will probably even do a good job against worms. But what Trojans, exploits, backdoors, spyware and the dozen other nasty software parasites? Malware and Antivirus
 
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    Science News from SciGuru.com

  • Researchers Build New "Off Switch" to Shut Down Neural Activity

    Science News Desk
    24 Apr 2014 | 11:23 am
    Nearly a decade ago, the era of optogenetics was ushered in with the development of channelrhodopsins, light-activated ion channels that can, with the flick of a switch, instantaneously turn on neurons in which they are genetically expressed. What has lagged behind, however, is the ability to use light to inactivate neurons with an equal level of reliability and efficiency.read more
  • Oxygen diminishes the heart’s ability to regenerate, researchers discover

    Science News Desk
    24 Apr 2014 | 10:00 am
    Scientific research at UT Southwestern Medical Center previously discovered that the newborn animal heart can heal itself completely, whereas the adult heart lacks this ability. New research by the same team today has revealed why the heart loses its incredible regenerative capability in adulthood, and the answer is quite simple – oxygen.read more
  • Take Notes by Hand for Better Long-Term Comprehension

    Science News Desk
    24 Apr 2014 | 8:30 am
    Dust off those Bic ballpoints and college-ruled notebooks — research shows that taking notes by hand is better than taking notes on a laptop for remembering conceptual information over the long term. The findings are published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.read more
  • Ocean microbes display remarkable genetic diversity

    Denise Brehm
    24 Apr 2014 | 4:49 am
    The smallest, most abundant marine microbe, Prochlorococcus, is a photosynthetic bacteria species essential to the marine ecosystem. An estimated billion billion billion of the single-cell creatures live in the oceans, forming the base of the marine food chain and occupying a range of ecological niches based on temperature, light and chemical preferences, and interactions with other species. But the full extent and characteristics of diversity within this single species remains a puzzle.  read more
  • Researchers Discover New Genetic Brain Disorder in Humans

    Science News Desk
    24 Apr 2014 | 3:02 am
    A newly identified disorder affecting the human nervous system is caused by a mutation in a gene never before implicated in human disease, according to two studies published by Cell Press April 24th in the journal Cell. By performing DNA sequencing of children affected by neurological problems, two research teams independently discovered that a disease marked by reduced brain size, as well as sensory and motor defects, is caused by a mutation in a gene called CLP1. Insights into this rare disorder may have important implications for the treatment of common disorders.read more
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    Patexia Rss Feed

  • Bio-Piracy: When Western Firms Usurp Eastern Medicine

    24 Apr 2014 | 11:23 am
    How access to prior art leads to better patents and innovation, as well as the threats of bio-piracy Bio-Piracy: When Western Firms Usurp Eastern Medicine - Forbes New research challenges the idea that Western firms are innovators and emerging markets are imitators.
  • Intellectual Ventures Patent Lawsuit Dismissed

    24 Apr 2014 | 9:13 am
    Last week Virginia U.S. District Judge Anthony Trenga dismissed a lawsuit filed against Capital One by Intellectual Ventures after finding that the two IV patents (US 8,083,137 and US 7,603,382) in the case were abstract ideas that could not be patented. The two patents declared invalid had also been asserted against Bank of America and several other financial institutions. http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/04/17/capital-one-fin-ruling-idUSL2N0N900G20140417
  • Google’s Stake in $2 Billion Apple-Samsung Trial Revealed

    22 Apr 2014 | 9:58 pm
    Google’s Stake in $2 Billion Apple-Samsung Trial Revealed - Bloomberg Google Inc.’s stake in the outcome of a $2 billion trial over smartphones using its Android operating system was revealed by testimony that the company indemnified Samsung Electronics Co. against some of Apple Inc.’s patent claims.
  • GE Plans to Act Like a Startup and Crowdsource Breakthrough Ideas

    22 Apr 2014 | 3:35 pm
    Basically all the reasons we love being a startup that uses crowdsourcing. Give it a read! How GE Plans to Act Like a Startup and Crowdsource Breakthrough Ideas | Design | WIRED GE calls its new focus on crowdsourcing “accessing the global brain.”
  • Valeant Offers to Buy Allergan

    22 Apr 2014 | 8:22 am
    Canadian based Valeant Pharmaceuticals has made an offer to buy Allergan for $45.7B in cash and stock. Investors in the Botox-producing Allergan would receive $48.30 in cash and 0.83% in Valeant stock for each share their currently own under the terms of the proposed deal. http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2014-04-21/valeant-ackman-said-to-team-up-for-takeover-of-allergan.html
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    Citizen Science Center

  • California Condor Science

    Chandra Clarke
    21 Apr 2014 | 2:14 pm
    The California Condor (Photo credit: Wikipedia)Let’s get this out of the way early—the California condor is not the prettiest of birds. With a wingspan of as much as 10 ft (3 m) and a weight of around 25 lbs (12 kg), it’s scary big. However, it performs an important function in our environment as a scavenger bird, eating carrion, or dead animals.Those dining habits, however, are making it difficult to conserve the species. Condors end up eating a lot of lead in the form of bullet fragments in the carcasses of animals hunted with lead ammunition. This means that condors frequently suffer…
  • Citizen science games: the ultimate list

    Chandra Clarke
    1 Apr 2014 | 11:50 am
    Play games for science!  Screenshot Credit: FraxinusThis week, by request: a huge list of games you can play and enjoy while contributing to the greater good. Go have fun!Astro Drone – Created by the European Space Agency, fly your Parrot AR drone in virtual space and compare yourself with real-life astronauts. Data from your successful flights will be used to train robots on how to navigate their environment. Website: http://www.astrodrone.org/. iTunes: https://itunes.apple.com/us/app/astro-drone/id597477649?ls=1&mt=8Apetopia – Run over a landscape and then choose the door with…
  • Sites mentioned in the citizen science TEDx talk

    Chandra Clarke
    21 Mar 2014 | 7:44 am
    By popular request: many of you have written to ask me to do a summary post of all the sites I mention in this TEDx talk, and I’m only too happy to oblige. Here they are in one convenient (and clickable!) place.The crowdfunding site is http://www.Experiment.com/FightMalaria@home: http://boinc.ucd.ie/fmah/ClimatePrediction.net: http://www.climateprediction.net/Zooniverse (lots of web-based citizen science projects) https://www.zooniverse.org/Old Weather: http://www.oldweather.org/Seafloor Explorer: http://www.seafloorexplorer.org/Fraxinus: https://apps.facebook.com/fraxinusgameEteRNA:…
  • Citizen science explained

    Chandra Clarke
    16 Mar 2014 | 4:58 pm
    Last month, I had the pleasure of speaking at a TEDx conference, where I explained the concept of citizen science to a very receptive and enthusiastic audience. Check it out, and please share it with your networks!The post Citizen science explained appeared first on Citizen Science Center.
  • TED Talk: Massive-scale online collaboration

    Chandra Clarke
    12 Mar 2014 | 5:50 pm
    Found this TED talk earlier today, which provides an excellent overview of some of the creative ways crowdsourcing and online collaboration is changing how we do things… just like with citizen science. The post TED Talk: Massive-scale online collaboration appeared first on Citizen Science Center.
 
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    Breaking Science News | Sci-News.com

  • Scientists Use Satellite Images to Track Uncontacted Amazonian Tribes

    Sci-News.com
    24 Apr 2014 | 9:03 am
    U.S. researchers from the University of Missouri and the University of New Mexico have used satellite images to track the movements and demographic health of an uncontacted tribe in the Brazilian state of Acre near the Peruvian border. Remote surveillance is the only method to safely track uncontacted indigenous societies and may offer information that [...]
  • Genetic Researchers Sequence Genome of Rainbow Trout

    Sci-News.com
    24 Apr 2014 | 8:20 am
    Scientists led by Dr Yann Guiguen from the French National Institute for Agricultural Research have successfully sequenced the genome of the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The rainbow trout, an elongated fish with sides that fade from green below the dorsal fin to yellow and white, belongs to Salmonidae, a family of fishes that also includes [...]
  • Bio-Duck: Scientists Solve Mystery of Strange Ocean Sounds

    Sci-News.com
    24 Apr 2014 | 6:21 am
    A new study led by Dr Denise Risch from NOAA’s Northeast Fisheries Science Center provides conclusive evidence that mysterious ocean sounds known as the bio-duck are produced by Antarctic minke whales (Balaenoptera bonaerensis). Bio-duck, or quacker, is the name given to a quacking-like sound which was first described by submarine personnel in the 1960s. The [...]
  • Binary Supermassive Black Hole System Discovered

    Sci-News.com
    24 Apr 2014 | 4:08 am
    Astronomers using ESA’s XMM-Newton X-ray observatory have discovered, for the first time, a pair of supermassive black holes in orbit around one another in an ordinary galaxy. Most massive galaxies in the Universe are thought to harbor at least one supermassive black hole at their center. Two supermassive black holes are the smoking gun that [...]
  • 100-Million-Year-Old Assassin Flies Found in Burmese Amber

    Sci-News.com
    23 Apr 2014 | 9:36 am
    Paleontologists have described a new species of assassin fly found preserved in two pieces of 100-million-year-old Burmese amber. Assassin flies are named for their fierce predation strategy – they ambush and catch their prey in flight. Once caught, the flies puncture the armor-like skeleton of their prey, inject them with digestive fluids and extract the [...]
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    CoolGomzyCoolGomzy

  • Friend of Friends Seth Rogen

    Admin
    24 Apr 2014 | 6:57 am
    Seth Rogen is a Canadian standup comedian turned actor, writer, director and producer in Hollywood. Rogen started his career performing stand-up comedy during his younger age, landed a small role in an American teen comedy- drama television series Freaks and Geeks.Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post's poll. Freaks and Geeks – A Real Breakthrough Freaks and Geeks was created by paul feig and Jude Apatow as executive producers. Unfortunately the series was canceled after only twelve episodes were aired. Freaks and Geeks has a…
  • Siachen: World’s Highest Battleground, Where it’s ‘Cold War’ for the Indian Army

    Admin
    3 Apr 2014 | 12:52 am
    Siachen Glacier situated at the altitude of 6,500 metres is the highest battlefield in the world where perpetual subzero temperature and frequent blizzards are the order of the day in the rarefied atmosphere. Read the article to know how Indian soldiers race this daily ordeal in the natural cold storage One cannot imagine having to pay in restaurant 550 rupees for just one tandoori roti even in the present day high inflation. Similarly, it is impossible to believe that transportation cost of a 25 kilogram bag of wheat from the market to one’s home can be as much as 50,000 rupees! In the…
  • Best Erotic Scenes of French Movies

    jaimin
    29 Nov 2012 | 10:50 pm
    The French are a great believer in non-artificial sex when it comes to cinema or any other place. And when it comes to erotic film projects from a French studio, you can be rest assured about the most steamy scenes shot, edited and produced in the most educated connoisseurs. For the squeamish, I must declare that enjoying French eroticism on film could take time. French Movie Masculin Féminin Here are the top scenes I would always love watching – Masculin Féminin (1966) – The scene where the protagonist’s (Paul, played by Jean-Pierre Leaud) secretary describes her encounter with…
  • International Refugees in India

    jaimin
    11 Nov 2011 | 3:30 am
    The lack of specific refugee legislation in India has led the government to adopt an ad-hoc approach to different refugee influxes. The status of refugees in India is governed mainly by political and administrative decisions rather than any codified model of conduct. The ad hoc nature of the Government’s approach has led to varying treatment of different refugee groups. Some groups are granted a full range of benefits including legal residence and the ability to be legally employed, whilst others are criminalized and denied access to basic social resources. The legal status of refugees in…
  • Tibetan Refugees in India

    jaimin
    11 Nov 2011 | 3:23 am
    Country of origin background Tibetan Refugees in India As recently as 1914, a Peace Convention was signed by Britain, China and Tibet that formally recognized Tibet as an independent country. Representatives from the major monasteries governed the country with the Dalai Lama heading the government. The Tibetan people have a deep-seated faith in religion and Buddhism ruled every aspect of their lives. In 1949 China invaded Tibet. Two years later Chinese troops forcibly occupied Tibet; killing, detaining and arresting thousands of Tibetan citizens. Reason for flight Following the Chinese…
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    CoolGomzyCoolGomzy

  • Friend of Friends Seth Rogen

    Admin
    24 Apr 2014 | 6:57 am
    Seth Rogen is a Canadian standup comedian turned actor, writer, director and producer in Hollywood. Rogen started his career performing stand-up comedy during his younger age, landed a small role in an American teen comedy- drama television series Freaks and Geeks.Note: There is a poll embedded within this post, please visit the site to participate in this post's poll. Freaks and Geeks – A Real Breakthrough Freaks and Geeks was created by paul feig and Jude Apatow as executive producers. Unfortunately the series was canceled after only twelve episodes were aired. Freaks and Geeks has a…
  • Siachen: World’s Highest Battleground, Where it’s ‘Cold War’ for the Indian Army

    Admin
    3 Apr 2014 | 12:52 am
    Siachen Glacier situated at the altitude of 6,500 metres is the highest battlefield in the world where perpetual subzero temperature and frequent blizzards are the order of the day in the rarefied atmosphere. Read the article to know how Indian soldiers race this daily ordeal in the natural cold storage One cannot imagine having to pay in restaurant 550 rupees for just one tandoori roti even in the present day high inflation. Similarly, it is impossible to believe that transportation cost of a 25 kilogram bag of wheat from the market to one’s home can be as much as 50,000 rupees! In the…
  • Best Erotic Scenes of French Movies

    jaimin
    29 Nov 2012 | 10:50 pm
    The French are a great believer in non-artificial sex when it comes to cinema or any other place. And when it comes to erotic film projects from a French studio, you can be rest assured about the most steamy scenes shot, edited and produced in the most educated connoisseurs. For the squeamish, I must declare that enjoying French eroticism on film could take time. French Movie Masculin Féminin Here are the top scenes I would always love watching – Masculin Féminin (1966) – The scene where the protagonist’s (Paul, played by Jean-Pierre Leaud) secretary describes her encounter with…
  • International Refugees in India

    jaimin
    11 Nov 2011 | 3:30 am
    The lack of specific refugee legislation in India has led the government to adopt an ad-hoc approach to different refugee influxes. The status of refugees in India is governed mainly by political and administrative decisions rather than any codified model of conduct. The ad hoc nature of the Government’s approach has led to varying treatment of different refugee groups. Some groups are granted a full range of benefits including legal residence and the ability to be legally employed, whilst others are criminalized and denied access to basic social resources. The legal status of refugees in…
  • Tibetan Refugees in India

    jaimin
    11 Nov 2011 | 3:23 am
    Country of origin background Tibetan Refugees in India As recently as 1914, a Peace Convention was signed by Britain, China and Tibet that formally recognized Tibet as an independent country. Representatives from the major monasteries governed the country with the Dalai Lama heading the government. The Tibetan people have a deep-seated faith in religion and Buddhism ruled every aspect of their lives. In 1949 China invaded Tibet. Two years later Chinese troops forcibly occupied Tibet; killing, detaining and arresting thousands of Tibetan citizens. Reason for flight Following the Chinese…
 
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    Right Eyes

  • Daytime Astronomy

    info@drstyle.me
    22 Apr 2014 | 9:04 am
    Astronomy isn’t just for the nighttime. There’s one star you can see during the day…the sun. Just a month ago (March 20th) the sun came up exactly due east and set due west. And it will do that again in December. We usually think of the sun rising in the east and setting in the(...) The post Daytime Astronomy appeared first on Right Eyes.
  • Cosmic eye flashes and flash phenomenon

    info@drstyle.me
    30 Mar 2014 | 5:33 pm
    It seems like I’m hearing more and more patients describe light streaks occurring in their eyes. It could just be chance though. The way they describe these effects pretty much tells me what’s happening (helps me diagnose) and rarely is it anything serious (there are other vascular problems that could cause strange vision problems like(...) The post Cosmic eye flashes and flash phenomenon appeared first on Right Eyes.
  • Vision misbeliefs won’t die

    info@drstyle.me
    13 Mar 2014 | 11:36 am
    I’m still reading my book, The Eye: A Natural History, and finally in the last chapter. Wow, the information in it isn’t something that I can just take with a grain of salt. The reason it’s taking so long to finish is because I’m looking up so much about what I read in it. Vision(...) The post Vision misbeliefs won’t die appeared first on Right Eyes.
  • What can a paleobiologist do with a Trilobite eye?

    info@drstyle.me
    10 Feb 2014 | 6:07 pm
    I’m still reading this book, The Eye: A Natural History, by Simon Ings. I keep getting sidetracked by all the interesting things I find in it and so my amazon.com wish list is getting longer with books I want to read. So, the trilobite, what an ancient critter. There were huge numbers of them, a prolific species(...) The post What can a paleobiologist do with a Trilobite eye? appeared first on Right Eyes.
  • Honey bee optic flow and road stripes

    info@drstyle.me
    30 Jan 2014 | 11:32 am
    I found out about this visual effect called optic flow and how it helps a Honey bee (aka honeybee) determine it’s speed and relative position to objects. This all makes sense….the faster you are going, the faster objects near you move by. That sensation is called optic flow and there are all kinds of mathematical(...) The post Honey bee optic flow and road stripes appeared first on Right Eyes.
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    Just Science

  • Caring for Crohn’s and UC

    Matthew Russell
    17 Apr 2014 | 9:02 pm
    The following is a guest post from Rebecca Kaplan.   Rebecca’s husband has Crohn’s disease and Rebecca writes a very informative blog: Caring for Crohn’s & UC which can be found here:   caringforcrohns.com     Clearing the Air… The post Caring for Crohn’s and UC appeared first on Just Science.
  • Dr. Seuss’s First Book Was Rejected 27 Times

    Matthew Russell
    17 Apr 2014 | 5:55 pm
    If there was ever an example of why you should never give up, this would have to be it. Dr. Seuss is one of the best known authors to have ever lived. His fame among children is renowned the world over. One of his most famous creations is The Cat In… The post Dr. Seuss’s First Book Was Rejected 27 Times appeared first on Just Science.
  • 5 Reasons Homework Destroys Learning

    Matthew Russell
    17 Apr 2014 | 5:44 pm
    By Mark Barnes I have blasted homework for many years in many places, yet this awful practice continues in schools worldwide, stirring a hatred of learning in many children. This article explains  why I stopped assigning homework . Meanwhile, here… The post 5 Reasons Homework Destroys Learning appeared first on Just Science.
  • Smart is the new dumb

    Matthew Russell
    17 Apr 2014 | 4:02 pm
    Note: This essay was first published in Paleo Magazine “Computers are useless. They can only give you answers.” Pablo Picasso “The production of too many useful things results in too many useless people.” Karl Marx       This will come…The post Smart is the new dumb appeared first on Just Science.
  • F.E.A.R. :False Evidence Appears Real

    Matthew Russell
    17 Apr 2014 | 3:55 pm
    In a 2011 article published in the Harvard Business Review, Peter Guber, former Chairman and CEO of Sony Pictures Entertainment, tells the story of how he made the case to Loews theater group (owned by Sony) to build a 16 or 20 movie screen multiplex…The post F.E.A.R. :False Evidence Appears Real appeared first on Just Science.
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    Wondergressive

  • Testosterone Therapy: Is It Worth The Risk?

    healthyheartbeatz
    30 Mar 2014 | 7:02 am
    We have all seen the ads. The commercials that come on in between your favorite Breaking Bad episodes, your adrenaline rushing and bravado showing. How about during your online browsing [...]The post Testosterone Therapy: Is It Worth The Risk? appeared first on Wondergressive.
  • Your First Real Heartbreak, Can it be Fatal?

    healthyheartbeatz
    3 Mar 2014 | 2:50 pm
    Heartbreak, happens, all the time. We have all been there before. We have all bled our hearts out, hurt until we couldn’t bear it anymore, and cried ourselves to sleep [...]The post Your First Real Heartbreak, Can it be Fatal? appeared first on Wondergressive.
  • Lucid Dreaming: A Step by Step Guide to Dream Control

    ericfein
    27 Feb 2014 | 2:02 pm
    A lucid dream is a dream where you know you’re dreaming and have full control over the dream. Lucid dreaming is a natural phenomenon, a science, and an art. As a [...]The post Lucid Dreaming: A Step by Step Guide to Dream Control appeared first on Wondergressive.
  • Internet Trolls: Why They Prosper From Your Grief

    healthyheartbeatz
    19 Feb 2014 | 2:12 pm
    Internet trolls are a force to be reckoned with. Have you ever played an online video game? Entered a chat room? Posted a topic? Wrote a blog? Of course you [...]The post Internet Trolls: Why They Prosper From Your Grief appeared first on Wondergressive.
  • State Nullification and the Tenther Movement: Fight the Fed

    ericfein
    13 Feb 2014 | 3:38 pm
    State nullification is a term you will be hearing more and more often in the coming years.  It is taking place all across the nation as states fight to take [...]The post State Nullification and the Tenther Movement: Fight the Fed appeared first on Wondergressive.
 
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    Tommylandz ツ

  • U.S. Senator Almost Gets Hit By A Train at Train Safety Conference

    Tommy Seilheimer
    21 Apr 2014 | 7:18 am
    U.S. Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.) narrowly escaped getting hit by a passing train at a commuter safety press conference Saturday. The senator, speaking at a conference aimed at increasing... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Six-Layer Pizza Cake Is About to Become a (Canadian) Reality

    Tommy Seilheimer
    18 Apr 2014 | 8:55 am
    Canadian pizza chain Boston Pizza (real actual thing) is holding a social media poll to determine which non-pizza food item it will attempt to graft pizza onto next. The current frontrunner is a... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • 10 Photos That Were Taken At The Perfect Time

    Tommy Seilheimer
    18 Apr 2014 | 6:28 am
    1. Rio de Janeiro’s Christ The Redeemer Struck By Lightning 2. Dog looks like it’s breathing fire. 3. A Tomahawk Cruise Missile about to impact 4. The real king of the court 5. Referee or Iceman 6. A... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • Star Wars Episode 7 Leak: Is that what I think it is?

    Tommy Seilheimer
    17 Apr 2014 | 9:54 am
    Who’s hungry for something, anything, Star Wars?! What’s that you say? You’re hungry enough to pull the ears off a Gundark Well, then good news for you! The first set photos out of... [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
  • This Is What Snake Venom Does To Your Blood

    Tommy Seilheimer
    16 Apr 2014 | 1:08 pm
    So amazing yet so frightening. This is exactly what happens when snake venom enters your blood stream… The post This Is What Snake Venom Does To Your Blood appeared first on Tommylandz ツ. [[ This is a content summary only. Visit my website for full links, other content, and more! ]]
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    iSains, Science Blog

  • Microbes, Cause Mass Extinction 252 Million Years Ago

    16 Apr 2014 | 10:50 pm
    In the history of the Earth, mass extinction is estimated to occur 252 million years ago, where 90 percent of Earth's species suddenly disappeared and is known as the largest mass extinction ever happened. Scientist has yet to determine the actual cause of mass extinctions, they are difficult to predict and various scientists expressed a controversial opinion. Researchers from the
  • Domestication Of Cattle Was First Originated From Middle East

    16 Apr 2014 | 10:17 pm
    How does the history of the domestication of cattle for meat and milk of mankind? Genetics team and anthropologists suspect that ancient man has brought the domestication of cattle in Africa almost 10,000 years ago. Scientists trying unmasked genetic history of 134 cows throughout the world, where they discover that the history of ancient African cattle originated from the 'Fertile Crescent', a
  • Discovered 2012 VP113, New And Farthest Planet In Solar System

    16 Apr 2014 | 9:28 pm
    Carnegie Scott Sheppard and Chadwick Trujillo of the Gemini Observatory have discovered a new member of the dwarf planet in the solar system called the 2012 VP113. This new planet at the edge of the solar system, the farthest orbit after the planet Pluto and Sedna, may be one of the thousands of distant objects that make up the Inner Oort Cloud. The size of the planet is estimated very large,
  • Scientists Discovered Ring System On Asteroid Chariklo

    16 Apr 2014 | 8:25 pm
    It's not just the planet Saturn has a ring system, but recent observations of a team of astronomers in South America including the ESO La Silla Observatory has discovered Asteroid Chariklo surrounded by two solid rings and narrow systems. The origin of the asteroid ring is still a mystery, maybe two ring systems are formed from collisions that are not directly create debris disks. The results
  • The Future Of Electric Generator Will Be Getting 30 Percent Of Energy

    26 Mar 2014 | 9:36 pm
    In the midst of rising demand for electricity, scientists continue to look for a way out for the industry that still uses an electric generator technology. Magnetide project is the development of a new type of generator which converts mechanical energy, which is generated from tidal energy into electricity, such as wind power generator and water.  Scientists modify the design of electric
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    All Inlined

  • Heartbeat caused HeartBleed bug

    11 Apr 2014 | 2:10 am
    On April 7th 2014, security researchers disclosed a new security bug called Heartbleed,one of the worst security holes in recent internet history.Heartbleed can reveal the contents of a web server's memory, where the most sensitive data is stored. That includes private data such as username, passwords or even credit card numbers.The researchers have tested the flaw out for themselves, and discovered that they were able to steal private  information without leaving any trace of their attack.This bug was independently discovered by Neel Mehta of Google Security, who first reported it to…
  • 20 useful IPhone tips

    8 Apr 2014 | 6:49 am
    1. Airplane mode gives a faster recharge   By activating airplane mode on your phone, you are turning off the WiFi, Bluetooth and network reception of the device and this will ensure a faster charging time. This can be very useful when you are in a hurry and find that your battery is going to die.2. Format text in mail.   Double-tap on any word to bring up the options menu, tap the arrow, and select the B/I/U options to bold, italicize, or underline your text.3. Stop the music with a timer   Many of us like to listen a song while going to sleep but often forget…
  • 10 amazing chemical reactions

    2 Apr 2014 | 3:01 am
    In this article, we present 10 chemical reactions that will keep you amazed for a couple of minutes. 1) Explosive Polymerization of p Nitro Aniline .  Spontaneous explosive polymerization of p Nitro Aniline by dehydration using concentrated sulphuric acid.    2) Liquid Nitrogen + 1500 Ping Pong balls.    3) Elephant toothpaste.   Decomposition of hydrogen peroxide catalyzed by potassium iodide.    4) Iodine Clock Reaction.   5) Mercury(II) thiocyanate decomposition .  6) Chameleon Chemical Reaction.  7) Decomposition of hydrogen…
  • Basics of Cloud Computing

    18 Mar 2014 | 10:13 am
    Imagine you have a computer with only one special software installed. Whether you need to edit an excel sheet or you need to play a movie or you need to send an email, all these can be done via this special software. Using this software, you login to a web-based service hosted on a remote machine and remote machine runs all the required softwares for you. Well, this  model is called cloud computing and it will change the way we are using computers nowadays.In a cloud computing environment, local computers no longer have to run all the applications. The network of remote computers that…
  • Useful tips for Windows 8 and 8.1

    7 Mar 2014 | 10:37 am
    Microsoft has released a new version of Windows8, named as Windos8.1 . Anyone using windows8 can upgrade to 8.1 free of cost. Here we list some of the shortcuts which helps you in working with the new versions of Windows.1) You can move any tile by clicking and dragging the tile. While moving a tile, if you need a larger view of the Start screen, move the tile towards the top or bottom of the screen.2) If you want to move a tile to taskbar, right-click the tile and choose Pin to taskbar.3) If you’re using a touch display, squeeze the Start screen with two fingers to receive a bird’s eye…
 
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    NaturPhilosophie

  • We Delve into Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Forensics!

    QuarX
    18 Apr 2014 | 2:35 pm
    Sleuthing with Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry is a technique for separating ions of different masses by measuring the time taken to traverse a fixed distance through a magnetic field.  Sounds a bit arcane?  The technique is used daily by forensic investigative teams to research criminal profiling and provide reliable evidence for the prosecution...  Latent Fingerprints Ever since the late 1800s, fingerprints have been at the heart of criminal forensic investigations.  Fingerprints, or finger marks, are made when the tip of the human finger comes into…
  • Fuelling our Lust for Copper – Mining in Afghanistan…

    QuarX
    9 Apr 2014 | 9:35 am
    Versatile Copper: Connecting Us for Generations Copper occurs naturally in rocks, as native copper, and the history of its use by the oldest civilizations dates back to at least 10,000 years.  These days, copper is in ever increasing demand for its extraordinarily versatile conductive and ductile properties, highly sought-after by the power generation, electronics and communications industries.  Remote barren war-torn Afghanistan harbours great stores of the mineral...  Copper is a ductile metal with a very high thermal, as well as electrical, conductivity.  Pure copper is soft…
  • Global Weirding: Why The World Must Acclimatise

    QuarX
    4 Apr 2014 | 1:23 pm
    Loading Up the Dice for Extreme Climate Events The impacts of climate change include a higher risk of flooding and changes to crop yields and water availability.  No single country causes climate change, and no one country can stop it.  We need to match the urgency of our response with the scale of the science. Steady inexorable floods affected the south of the British Isles earlier this year.  Extraordinary amounts of rain fell over a couple of months.  Unrelentingly.  Elsewhere, why not take your pick from the devastating effects on your living environment of a polar…
  • Meanwhile Major Tim has been Training for Space in Cologne, Germany…

    QuarX
    29 Mar 2014 | 9:14 am
    Space Training in Kölnisch Waters Major Timothy Peake has been training for space underwater in Germany to prepare for work in zero gravity.  The British astronaut who is set to go into space next year said that learning how to live and work in space will be essential to the future survival of our species.  Tim Peake will be spending six months on the International Space Station I.S.S. in November or December of next year.  He will travel on a Soyuz rocket from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan... and could eat a meal chosen by the public.  With nearly two decades as an Army…
  • The Enduring Mystery of Earthquake Lights – What Makes a Miracle?

    QuarX
    25 Mar 2014 | 1:10 pm
    Earthquake Lights in the Sky Mysterious flashes of light and clear-sky lightning, blue flames?  Glowing orbs and fireballs?  Will-o'-the-wisps?  Stand-alone rainbow clouds and light pillars?  How could this be...? Scientists in the United States now say that earthquake lightning flashes appearing to precede earthquakes, are likely to be sparked by movements within the ground below.  This phenomenon could be used to trigger alarms and help warn millions of an impending danger... According to the Encyclopedia of Solid Earth Geophysics, the earliest known account of earthquake…
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    FiveThirtyEightScience | FiveThirtyEight

  • Are Older Men’s Sperm Really Any Worse?

    Emily Oster
    24 Apr 2014 | 3:00 am
    Everyone knows that a woman’s eggs don’t improve with age. The arbiter of turn-of-the-millennium pop culture, “Sex and the City,” gave us the image of the single woman in her mid-30s (Miranda) and her maturing eggs. And while fertility may not quite fall off a cliff at 35, it’s hard for women to ignore the idea that things are getting worse as they get older. Obstetricians have a special category for pregnant women over 35: “advanced maternal age.”So, I challenge any woman in this group not to feel just a teensy bit of schadenfreude at the increasing discussion of aging…
  • Tornado Season Is Off to a Slow Start, But There’s No Predicting What’s Next

    Matt Lanza
    15 Apr 2014 | 6:45 am
    Tornado season has started quietly this year, continuing a trend that began in 2012. Through March 31, the United States had only 70 reported tornadoes even though the first quarter has averaged more than 170 a year over the last 10 years. April has remained quiet, with 36 preliminary tornado reports as of Sunday. Oklahoma hasn’t seen an intense tornado2 since May 31, the longest such stretch on record. The small tornado seen there on Sunday was the first of any kind since Aug. 7.Many people have written about the possible causes, from drought to persistent cooler weather in places that…
  • Are Mammograms Worth It?

    Emily Oster
    10 Apr 2014 | 3:00 am
    A Canadian study published in February reignited the years-long debate over breast cancer screening methods, arguing fairly strongly against mammography, or the use of X-rays to detect tumors. The study’s authors say mammograms have no survival benefit relative to physical breast exams and in fact lead to significant over-diagnosis. In their words: “The data suggest that the value of mammography screening should be reassessed.” Predictably, not everyone agreed with them.The debate over mammograms centers on two questions. First, how many lives are saved by mammography? Or…
  • El Niño Probably Won’t Quench California’s Thirst

    Stephen Stirling
    3 Apr 2014 | 8:30 am
    Hope is a hot commodity in drought-stricken California these days. When the Climate Prediction Center last month issued an El Niño watch for next winter, the media jumped on news of the weather phenomenon as possible salvation for the Golden State. “Thirsty California pins hopes on El Niño’s return,” one headline on SFGate read. “So long California drought?” Businessweek asked in another. The rush to identify El Niño, characterized by the periodic warming of surface water temperatures off the northwestern coast of South America, as California’s savior was based in part on…
  • MIT Climate Scientist Responds on Disaster Costs And Climate Change

    Kerry Emanuel
    31 Mar 2014 | 9:13 am
    As someone who has spent some time looking at changes in the incidence of hurricanes around the planet, I have been asked to provide a response to Roger Pielke Jr.’s article “Disasters Cost More Than Ever — But Not Because of Climate Change,” published at FiveThirtyEight earlier this month.Let me begin by saying that I am sympathetic to Pielke’s emphasis on the role of changing demographics in increasing damages from natural disasters. This is a serious problem that could be addressed by wiser policies. For example, in the United States, policies regulating insurance and…
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    Green Planet

  • Bio plastics

    Prasun Barua
    22 Apr 2014 | 1:46 pm
    What is Bio plastics?Bio plastics are the bio based plastics produced from renewable resources like corn starch, pea starch, vegetable fats and oils. On the other hand, conventional plastics or fossil fuel plastics are produced from petroleum. Conventional plastics create more greenhouse gas which is very dangerous for our environment. Petroleum is very limited resource in the earth. It becomes expensive day by day. One day, this resource will be finished. During burning petroleum products like plastics, carbon is emitted and it causes the climate change. Conventional plastics are harmful…
  • Solar Water Disinfection

    Prasun Barua
    27 Mar 2014 | 12:44 pm
    We know that water is an important element in our life. Our lives are survived by water. Indeed, our body contains huge amount of water. Purified water can save our life. On the other hand, germ infected water can destroy our life. So, we need to drink water which is disinfected. We can make our water disinfected by utilizing various systems. Solar Water Disinfection is one of the significant system to make our water disinfected.Solar Water Disinfection is a system which utilizes solar energy to remove biological agents like bacteria, protozoa, viruses and worms from water and makes it…
  • Biomass

    Prasun Barua
    26 Mar 2014 | 4:37 am
    What is Biomass?Biomass is the biological component which is obtained from living organisms of nature. It is also referred as plant based material when energy is produced from biomass. At the same time, biomass is also applicable for both animal and vegetable resultant components.Biomass is a renewable energy source and it can re-grow quite quickly. Sun's energy is captured by plants' chlorophyll through the photosynthesis process. Here, carbohydrates are created by converting carbon dioxide from the air and water from the ground. They are complex combination of carbon, hydrogen and oxygen.
  • Hygroelectricity

    Prasun Barua
    20 Mar 2014 | 6:42 pm
    For long time, It has been a great mystery how electricity appears in the atmosphere. But, recent research says that atmospheric water vapor can turn into electrical charge. They are calling it hygroelectricity which means humid electricity.Now, it is realized that hygroelectricity is one kind of static electricity which appears on water droplets and can be moved from droplets to small dust particles. It is a common phenomenon in the earth's atmosphere. Hygroelectric charge exists in thunderstorms volcanic eruptions and some   dust storms which creates lightning. Once, scientists…
  • BIPV

    Prasun Barua
    19 Mar 2014 | 11:46 am
    What is BIPV?Full abbreviation of BIPV is Building Integrated Photovoltaic. This is a technology which integrates photovoltaic modules into the roof or exterior of a building. By concurrently serving as building, a BIPV system serves as both envelope material and electrical power generator. It contributes to save materials and electricity costs as well as minimize the dependency on fossil fuels. It reduces carbon emission and enhances the architectural value of a building.Most of BIPV systems are connected with available grid power. We can also use them as stand-alone, off-grid systems. A…
 
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    Science Center

  • FIELD EXCURSION AROUND SHIKHAR FALL

    Harshit Pandey
    23 Apr 2014 | 11:38 am
    INTRODUCTION The field excursion was done along the stream originating from the shikhar fall which has the geological location around Krol region. This Krol region which has got...
  • Sony Xperia Z Specification

    Harshit Pandey
    22 Apr 2014 | 7:45 am
    GENERAL2G NetworkGSM 850 / 900 / 1800 / 1900 - C6602, C66033G NetworkHSDPA 850 / 900 / 2100 - C6603 HSDPA 850 / 900 / 1700 / 1900 / 2100 - C66024G NetworkLTE 800 / 850 / 900 / 1800 / 2100 / 2600...
  • Samasung Galaxy Grand Specifications

    Harshit Pandey
    21 Apr 2014 | 11:07 am
    GENERAL2G NetworkGSM 850 / 900 / 1800 / 19003G NetworkHSDPA 850 / 1900 / 2100 HSDPA 900 / 1900 / 2100SIMMini-SIMAnnounced2012, DecemberStatusAvailable. Released 2013, AprilBODYDimensions143.5 x...
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